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Renminbi Internationalization: Prospects and Implications for Economic Integration in East Asia

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  • Yung Chul Park

    (Division of International Studies Korea University 51 Anam-dong, Seongbuk-gu Seoul 136-701, Korea)

  • Chi-Young Song

    (Department of Commerce and Finance Kookmin University 861-1 Jeongnueng-dong, Seongbuk-gu Seoul 136-702, Korea)

Abstract

This paper argues that renminbi (RMB) internationalization and China's strategic interests in ASEAN will combine to deepen economic integration and pave the way for creating a de facto RMB bloc consisting of the 10 ASEAN countries, China, Hong Kong, and Taiwan—a grouping we call ASEAN+New3. Such a currency bloc is likely to weaken the initiatives of the existing ASEAN+3 (China, Japan, and Korea) for regional monetary-financial cooperation because neither Japan nor can Korea join the new currency bloc for economic and political reasons. This paper also argues that RMB internationalization would delay the resolution of the trade imbalance between East Asia and the United States because China would be pressured by the other members of ASEAN+New3 to maintain stability of the RMB vis-à-vis the U.S. dollar. © 2011 The Earth Institute at Columbia University and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology.

Suggested Citation

  • Yung Chul Park & Chi-Young Song, 2011. "Renminbi Internationalization: Prospects and Implications for Economic Integration in East Asia," Asian Economic Papers, MIT Press, vol. 10(3), pages 42-72, Fall.
  • Handle: RePEc:tpr:asiaec:v:10:y:2011:i:3:p:42-72
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Soloaga, Isidro & Alan Wintersb, L., 2001. "Regionalism in the nineties: what effect on trade?," The North American Journal of Economics and Finance, Elsevier, pages 1-29.
    2. Robert C. Feenstra & Robert E. Lipsey & Haiyan Deng & Alyson C. Ma & Hengyong Mo, 2005. "World Trade Flows: 1962-2000," NBER Working Papers 11040, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    3. Judith M. Dean & K. C. Fung & Zhi Wang, 2011. "Measuring Vertical Specialization: The Case of China," Review of International Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 19(4), pages 609-625, September.
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    6. Fukunari KIMURA, 2006. "International Production and Distribution Networks in East Asia: Eighteen Facts, Mechanics, and Policy Implications," Asian Economic Policy Review, Japan Center for Economic Research, vol. 1(2), pages 326-344.
    7. Marcus Noland, 1995. "China and the International Economic System," Working Paper Series WP95-6, Peterson Institute for International Economics.
    8. Yung Chul Park & Kwanho Shin, 2009. "Economic Integration and Changes in the Business Cycle in East Asia: Is the Region Decoupling from the Rest of the World?-super-," Asian Economic Papers, MIT Press, pages 107-140.
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    Cited by:

    1. Boubakri, Salem & Guillaumin, Cyriac, 2015. "Regional integration of the East Asian stock markets: An empirical assessment," Journal of International Money and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 57(C), pages 136-160.
    2. Batten, Jonathan A. & Szilagyi, Peter G., 2016. "The internationalisation of the RMB: New starts, jumps and tipping points," Emerging Markets Review, Elsevier, vol. 28(C), pages 221-238.
    3. Subramanian Arvind & Kessler Martin, 2013. "The Renminbi Bloc is Here: Asia Down, Rest of the World to Go?," Journal of Globalization and Development, De Gruyter, vol. 4(1), pages 49-94, August.
    4. Berdiev, Aziz N. & Chang, Chun-Ping, 2015. "Business cycle synchronization in Asia-Pacific: New evidence from wavelet analysis," Journal of Asian Economics, Elsevier, pages 20-33.
    5. Torsten Ehlers & Frank Packer, 2013. "FX and derivatives markets in emerging economies and the internationalisation of their currencies," BIS Quarterly Review, Bank for International Settlements, December.
    6. Eichengreen, Barry & Flandreau, Marc & Mehl, Arnaud & Chitu, Livia, 2017. "International Currencies Past, Present, and Future: Two Views from Economic History," OUP Catalogue, Oxford University Press, number 9780190659455.
    7. Keddad, Benjamin, 2016. "How do the Renminbi and other East Asian currencies co-move?," MPRA Paper 83782, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    8. Chien, Mei-Se & Lee, Chien-Chiang & Hu, Te-Chung & Hu, Hui-Ting, 2015. "Dynamic Asian stock market convergence: Evidence from dynamic cointegration analysis among China and ASEAN-5," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 51(C), pages 84-98.
    9. repec:mes:emfitr:v:53:y:2017:i:12:p:2845-2857 is not listed on IDEAS
    10. repec:spr:jqecon:v:15:y:2017:i:3:d:10.1007_s40953-016-0062-3 is not listed on IDEAS

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