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Turning values concrete: the role and ways of business selection in local currency schemes

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  • Jérôme Blanc
  • Marie Fare

Abstract

Alternative consumption schemes require the selection of producers and traders according to criteria and through processes that should make alternative values concrete. The way values turn concrete is crucial for the effectiveness of such projects. This paper investigates the ways criteria and processes are defined and their real meanings and uses through the case of associative local currencies. Drawing on the framework of proximities, it analyses local currency schemes as combining proximities (geographical and non-geographical) and selection processes set up for providers wishing to join. Selection processes may be based on a charter, an approval committee and screening criteria. The objectives of the selection, its measures in principle, the way in which it is applied as well as the practical consequences are discussed. Even when charters and formal participatory schemes for selecting providers are established, proximities appear as the keystone of selection and trust.

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  • Jérôme Blanc & Marie Fare, 2016. "Turning values concrete: the role and ways of business selection in local currency schemes," Review of Social Economy, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 74(3), pages 298-319, September.
  • Handle: RePEc:taf:rsocec:v:74:y:2016:i:3:p:298-319 DOI: 10.1080/00346764.2016.1168035
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    Cited by:

    1. Jérôme Blanc, 2017. "Making sense of the plurality of money: a polanyian attempt," Post-Print halshs-01555623, HAL.
    2. Camille Meyer & Marek Hudon, 2017. "Alternative organizations in finance: commoning in complementary currencies," Working Papers CEB 17-015, ULB -- Universite Libre de Bruxelles.

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