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Immigration and the dependency ratio of a host population

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  • Zheng Wu
  • Nan Li

Abstract

This paper examines the long-term impact of constant immigration on the dependency ratio in an SI population (a stationary population through constant immigration) in the context of the stable population model. Our analysis has three main findings. First, in SI populations, a younger population (a lower aging ratio) does not necessarily have a lower dependency ratio. An SI population has a lower dependency ratio than a closed stationary population, provided immigration is concentrated around the youngest working age in the host population. Second, under the same condition, selecting high-fertility immigrants increases the dependency ratio. Third, also under the same condition, substituting working-age immigrants with young (dependent) immigrants increases the dependency ratio. Using the United Nations model age structures of immigrants, our empirical illustration confirms these analytical results.

Suggested Citation

  • Zheng Wu & Nan Li, 2003. "Immigration and the dependency ratio of a host population," Mathematical Population Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 10(1), pages 21-39.
  • Handle: RePEc:taf:mpopst:v:10:y:2003:i:1:p:21-39
    DOI: 10.1080/08898480306715
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    Cited by:

    1. repec:eee:thpobi:v:82:y:2012:i:3:p:158-169 is not listed on IDEAS
    2. Cygan-Rehm, Kamila, 2013. "Do immigrants follow their home country's fertility norms?," FAU Discussion Papers in Economics 04/2013, Friedrich-Alexander University Erlangen-Nuremberg, Institute for Economics.
    3. Gustav Feichtinger & Andrey Krasovskii & Alexia Prskawetz & Vladimir Veliov, 2012. "Optimal age-specific election policies in two-level organizations with fixed size," Central European Journal of Operations Research, Springer;Slovak Society for Operations Research;Hungarian Operational Research Society;Czech Society for Operations Research;Österr. Gesellschaft für Operations Research (ÖGOR);Slovenian Society Informatika - Section for Operational Research;Croatian Operational Research Society, vol. 20(4), pages 649-677, December.
    4. Carl Schmertmann, 2012. "Stationary populations with below-replacement fertility," Demographic Research, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany, vol. 26(14), pages 319-330, April.
    5. Frank T. Denton & Byron G. Spencer, 2005. "Population Aging and the Macroeconomy: Explorations in the Use of Immigration as an Instrument of Control," Social and Economic Dimensions of an Aging Population Research Papers 135, McMaster University.
    6. Kamila Cygan-Rehm, 2014. "Immigrant Fertility in Germany: The Role of Culture," SOEPpapers on Multidisciplinary Panel Data Research 707, DIW Berlin, The German Socio-Economic Panel (SOEP).
    7. Don Drummond & Evan Capeluck & Matthew Calver, 2015. "The Key Challenge for Canadian Public Policy: Generating Inclusive and Sustainable Economic Growth," CSLS Research Reports 2015-11, Centre for the Study of Living Standards.
    8. Kamila Cygan-Rehm, 2011. "Between here and there: Immigrant fertility patterns in Germany," Working Papers 109, Bavarian Graduate Program in Economics (BGPE).

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