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Teaching with Technology: May You Live in Interesting Times

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  • William L. Goffe
  • Kim Sosin

Abstract

During the past 10 years, teaching with computer technology, such as e-mail and the Web, has become customary throughout undergraduate economic education. The authors review the literature on the implications for student learning, present specific educational activities that use a number of different computer technologies, and discuss growing problems, such as "cyber-plagiarism," along with suggesting potential solutions. The future of using technology for teaching economics will be the continuation of recent trends: increased portability in the access to instruction and increased opportunities for interaction, including students' interaction with the material and with the instructor and other students.

Suggested Citation

  • William L. Goffe & Kim Sosin, 2005. "Teaching with Technology: May You Live in Interesting Times," The Journal of Economic Education, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 36(3), pages 278-291, July.
  • Handle: RePEc:taf:jeduce:v:36:y:2005:i:3:p:278-291
    DOI: 10.3200/JECE.36.3.278-291
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    File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10.3200/JECE.36.3.278-291
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Christopher N. Annala & Shuo Chen & Daniel R. Strang, . "The Use of PRS in Introductory Microeconomics: Some Evidence on Performance and Attendance," Journal for Economic Educators, Middle Tennessee State University, Business and Economic Research Center.
    2. Oskar Harmon & William Alpert & Archita Banik & James Lambrinos, 2015. "Class Absence, Instructor Lecture Notes, Intellectual Styles, and Learning Outcomes," Atlantic Economic Journal, Springer;International Atlantic Economic Society, vol. 43(3), pages 349-361, September.
    3. Frank Raymond & Anne Raymond & Myra McCrickard, 2008. "Stuck Behind the Math: Just How Helpful Can One Expect Technology to be in the Economics Classroom?," International Review of Economic Education, Economics Network, University of Bristol, vol. 7(1), pages 62-102.
    4. Oskar R. Harmon & James Lambrinos, 2006. "Online Format vs. Live Mode of Instruction: Do Human Capital Differences or Differences in Returns to Human Capital Explain the Differences in Outcomes?," Working papers 2006-07, University of Connecticut, Department of Economics.
    5. Timothy C. Haab & Aaron Schiff & John C. Whitehead, 2011. "Economics Blogs and Economic Education," Chapters,in: International Handbook on Teaching and Learning Economics, chapter 15 Edward Elgar Publishing.

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