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Lessons from the Specific Factors Model of International Trade

Author

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  • Soumaya M. Tohamy
  • J. Wilson Mixon

Abstract

The Specific Factors model is an excellent learning tool. It provides insights into the meaning of economic efficiency, how complex economies simultaneously determine prices and quantities (and that it is relative prices that matter), and how changes in demand conditions or technology can affect income distributions among owners of factors of production. The authors develop this model using spreadsheets. Spreadsheets help students deal with “what-if” questions within prepared spreadsheets. They also give students the chance to look into the workings of the model and to change its structure. The exercise spreadsheets provide important advantages over using “black-box” presentations. Moreover, using spreadsheets gives students an opportunity to practice their use of spreadsheet software.

Suggested Citation

  • Soumaya M. Tohamy & J. Wilson Mixon, 2003. "Lessons from the Specific Factors Model of International Trade," The Journal of Economic Education, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 34(2), pages 139-150, January.
  • Handle: RePEc:taf:jeduce:v:34:y:2003:i:2:p:139-150
    DOI: 10.1080/00220480309595208
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    File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10.1080/00220480309595208
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. John Gilbert, 2009. "A 'Live' Version of the Specific Factors Model in Excel," Working Papers 2009-12, Utah State University, Department of Economics, revised 11 Oct 2009.
    2. Gilbert John & Oladi Reza, 2007. "Simulating Tariffs vs. Quotas with Domestic Monopoly," Journal of Industrial Organization Education, De Gruyter, vol. 2(1), pages 1-11, October.
    3. Reza Oladi & John Gilbert, 2006. "A Simulation Experiment of a Customs Union," Computers in Higher Education Economics Review, Economics Network, University of Bristol, vol. 18(1), pages 29-33.
    4. Amy Peng, 2009. "Introducing CGE Models to the Classroom Using EXCEL," Working Papers 013, Ryerson University, Department of Economics.
    5. Omer GOKCEKUS & Kevin BENGYAK, 2015. "Learning Heckscher-Ohlin Model in Five Easy Steps," Journal of Economics and Political Economy, KSP Journals, vol. 2(1), pages 137-143, March.
    6. William Hamlen & Kevin Hamlen, 2012. "An Interactive Computer Model of Two-Country Trade," International Review of Economic Education, Economics Network, University of Bristol, vol. 11(2), pages 91-101.

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