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HIV/AIDS in Africa: Fertile Terrain

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  • E. Stillwaggon

Abstract

An interdisciplinary approach that incorporates biomedical data into an economic analysis provides the necessary foundation for HIV/AIDS policy in poor countries. This article examines the biomedical effects of economic conditions in Africa that contribute to high rates of HIV transmission. The results of statistical analysis show the correlation of economic and epidemiological variables (nutrition, distribution of income, and urbanisation) with rates of HIV. The economic/biomedical hypothesis implies a broad policy response for confronting HIV/AIDS in Africa and in Asia and Latin America.

Suggested Citation

  • E. Stillwaggon, 2002. "HIV/AIDS in Africa: Fertile Terrain," Journal of Development Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 38(6), pages 1-22.
  • Handle: RePEc:taf:jdevst:v:38:y:2002:i:6:p:1-22
    DOI: 10.1080/00220380412331322561
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Lachaud, Jean-Pierre, 2007. "HIV prevalence and poverty in Africa: Micro- and macro-econometric evidences applied to Burkina Faso," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 26(3), pages 483-504, May.
    2. O'Laughlin, B., 2006. "AIDS, freedom and the moral community of citizens in Southern Africa," ISS Working Papers - General Series 19184, International Institute of Social Studies of Erasmus University Rotterdam (ISS), The Hague.
    3. Nicoli Nattrass, 2003. "Unemployment and AIDS: The Social-Democratic Challenge for South Africa," SALDRU/CSSR Working Papers 043, Southern Africa Labour and Development Research Unit, University of Cape Town.
    4. Te Lintelo, D., 2009. "SΘcuritΘ alimentaire, nutrition et VIH/SIDA dans les pΩcheries africaines: information Θmergente et direction de la recherche: ╔tude documentaire," Working Papers, The WorldFish Center, number 38697, June.
    5. Banda-Nyirenda, D. & Hâ ¿sken, S.M.C. & Kaunda, W., 2009. "Impact of nutrition and fish supplementation on the response to anti retroviral therapy, Zambia: a literature review," Working Papers, The WorldFish Center, number 38680, June.

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