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Situating community enterprise: A theoretical exploration

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  • Peter Somerville
  • Gerard McElwee

Abstract

This paper argues that enterprises can be understood primarily in terms of their social bases and that the social base of community enterprise lies in community of some kind. It reviews current conceptualizations in this area such as ‘community-based enterprise’ (CBE) and ‘social enterprise’, and argues that CBE is only one form of community enterprise. Community entrepreneurs are understood in terms of their position on a continuum of community participation, as economic/social/political activists, and community enterprise is explained largely in terms of the balance of social capital functions served by its overall activity. The relationship between membership of a community enterprise and membership of a community is explored, and represented in terms of two criteria: the pool from which enterprise members are drawn and the rule by which such members are selected from the pool. This paper illustrates its arguments in relation to two English community enterprises, Coin Street Community Builders based in London and The Eldonians based in Liverpool.

Suggested Citation

  • Peter Somerville & Gerard McElwee, 2011. "Situating community enterprise: A theoretical exploration," Entrepreneurship & Regional Development, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 23(5-6), pages 317-330, June.
  • Handle: RePEc:taf:entreg:v:23:y:2011:i:5-6:p:317-330 DOI: 10.1080/08985626.2011.580161
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Jock Collins, 2003. "Cultural diversity and entrepreneurship: policy responses to immigrant entrepreneurs in Australia," Entrepreneurship & Regional Development, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 15(2), pages 137-149, January.
    2. Robert C. Kloosterman, 2003. "Creating opportunities. Policies aimed at increasing openings for immigrant entrepreneurs in the Netherlands," Entrepreneurship & Regional Development, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 15(2), pages 167-181, January.
    3. Jock Collins, 1994. "The Changing Political Economy of Australian Racism," Working Paper Series 41, Finance Discipline Group, UTS Business School, University of Technology, Sydney.
    4. Monder Ram & Sue Marlow & Dean Patton, 2001. "Managing the locals: employee relations in South Asian restaurants," Entrepreneurship & Regional Development, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 13(3), pages 229-245, July.
    5. Maria Kontos, 2003. "Self-employment policies and migrants' entrepreneurship in Germany," Entrepreneurship & Regional Development, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 15(2), pages 119-135, January.
    6. Monder Ram & David Smallbone, 2003. "Policies to support ethnic minority enterprise: the English experience," Entrepreneurship & Regional Development, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 15(2), pages 151-166, January.
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Soviana, Soviana, 2013. "Framework for Analyzing Community-Based Enterprise (CBE): Literature review of organizational architecture and organizational performance," EconStor Preprints 74719, ZBW - German National Library of Economics.
    2. repec:ids:ijesbu:v:31:y:2017:i:4:p:570-589 is not listed on IDEAS
    3. Carías Vega, Dora E. & Keenan, Rodney J., 2016. "Situating community forestry enterprises within New Institutional Economic theory: What are the implications for their organization?," Journal of Forest Economics, Elsevier, pages 1-13.
    4. Camille Meyer & Marek Hudon, 2017. "Alternative organizations in finance: commoning in complementary currencies," Working Papers CEB 17-015, ULB -- Universite Libre de Bruxelles.
    5. Reinout Kleinhans & Maarten Van Ham, 2017. "The support paradox in community enterprise experiments in the Netherlands," International Journal of Entrepreneurship and Small Business, Inderscience Enterprises Ltd, vol. 31(4), pages 570-589.
    6. Soviana, Soviana, 2013. "Case Survey for Assessing Community-Based Enterprise: A Research Design," EconStor Preprints 84707, ZBW - German National Library of Economics.

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