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The power of the pram: do young children determine female job satisfaction?

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  • T. Kifle
  • P. Kler
  • S. Shankar

Abstract

Policy-makers worldwide have attempted a number of strategies over the last few decades to increase female labour-force participation without jeopardizing their choice of also maintaining a fulfilling family life, should they choose to do so. One such Australian strategy heavily subscribed by females with young children has been to promote part-time employment. Results provide evidence that females with young children at home engaged in part-time employment are generally more satisfied with their working hours and work--life balance relative to those with older and no children, whilst the opposite holds when looking at those in full-time employment. This suggests that part-time employment should be pursued as a policy tool to aid females with young children maintain a relationship with the labour market without having to also give up being the primary carer of their children.

Suggested Citation

  • T. Kifle & P. Kler & S. Shankar, 2014. "The power of the pram: do young children determine female job satisfaction?," Applied Economics Letters, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 21(4), pages 289-292, March.
  • Handle: RePEc:taf:apeclt:v:21:y:2014:i:4:p:289-292
    DOI: 10.1080/13504851.2013.856991
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Cheryl Carleton & Mary T. Kelly, 2016. "Alternative Work Arrangements and Job Satisfaction," Villanova School of Business Department of Economics and Statistics Working Paper Series 32, Villanova School of Business Department of Economics and Statistics.
    2. Parvinder Kler & Azhar Hussain Potia & Sriram Shankar, 2018. "Underemployment in Australia: a panel investigation," Applied Economics Letters, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 25(1), pages 24-28, January.
    3. Blunch, Niels-Hugo & Ribar, David & Western, Mark, 2018. "Under Pressure? Assessing the Roles of Skills and Other Personal Resources for Work-Life Strains," GLO Discussion Paper Series 292, Global Labor Organization (GLO).
    4. Blunch, Niels-Hugo & Ribar, David C. & Western, Mark, 2018. "Under Pressure? Assessing the Roles of Skills and Other Personal Resources for Work-Life Strains," IZA Discussion Papers 12055, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
    5. T. Kifle & P. Kler & S. Shankar, 2017. "Underemployment and its impact on job satisfaction: An Australian study on part-time employment," Discussion Papers in Economics economics:201712, Griffith University, Department of Accounting, Finance and Economics.

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