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Information processing and the UK weekend effect: do investors cut their losses on Mondays?

  • James Steeley

This paper complements earlier work by the author that shows that the pattern of information arrivals into the UK stock market may explain the behaviour of returns. It is argued that delays or other systematic behaviour in the processing of this information could compound the impact of information arrival patterns. It is found, however, that this does not happen, and so it is the arrival and not the processing of news that is most important.

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File URL: http://www.informaworld.com/openurl?genre=article&doi=10.1080/1350485042000263890&magic=repec&7C&7C8674ECAB8BB840C6AD35DC6213A474B5
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Article provided by Taylor & Francis Journals in its journal Applied Economics Letters.

Volume (Year): 11 (2004)
Issue (Month): 14 ()
Pages: 895-899

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Handle: RePEc:taf:apeclt:v:11:y:2004:i:14:p:895-899
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  1. Chang, Eric C. & Michael Pinegar, J. & Ravichandran, R., 1998. "US day-of-the-week effects and asymmetric responses to macroeconomic news," Journal of Banking & Finance, Elsevier, vol. 22(5), pages 513-534, May.
  2. Andrews, Donald W K, 1991. "Heteroskedasticity and Autocorrelation Consistent Covariance Matrix Estimation," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 59(3), pages 817-58, May.
  3. Lakonishok, Josef & Maberly, Edwin, 1990. " The Weekend Effect: Trading Patterns of Individual and Institutional Investors," Journal of Finance, American Finance Association, vol. 45(1), pages 231-43, March.
  4. Theobald, Michael & Price, Vera, 1984. " Seasonality Estimation in Thin Markets," Journal of Finance, American Finance Association, vol. 39(2), pages 377-92, June.
  5. Newey, Whitney & West, Kenneth, 2014. "A simple, positive semi-definite, heteroscedasticity and autocorrelation consistent covariance matrix," Applied Econometrics, Publishing House "SINERGIA PRESS", vol. 33(1), pages 125-132.
  6. Gibbons, Michael R & Hess, Patrick, 1981. "Day of the Week Effects and Asset Returns," The Journal of Business, University of Chicago Press, vol. 54(4), pages 579-96, October.
  7. Terence Mills & J. Andrew Coutts, 1995. "Calendar effects in the London Stock Exchange FT-SE indices," The European Journal of Finance, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 1(1), pages 79-93.
  8. Zainudin Arsad & J. Andrew Coutts, 1997. "Security price anomalies in the London International Stock Exchange: a 60 year perspective," Applied Financial Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 7(5), pages 455-464.
  9. Abraham, Abraham & Ikenberry, David L., 1994. "The Individual Investor and the Weekend Effect," Journal of Financial and Quantitative Analysis, Cambridge University Press, vol. 29(02), pages 263-277, June.
  10. Chang, Eric C. & Pinegar, J. Michael & Ravichandran, R., 1993. "International Evidence on the Robustness of the Day-of-the-Week Effect," Journal of Financial and Quantitative Analysis, Cambridge University Press, vol. 28(04), pages 497-513, December.
  11. Kim, Chan-Wung & Park, Jinwoo, 1994. "Holiday Effects and Stock Returns: Further Evidence," Journal of Financial and Quantitative Analysis, Cambridge University Press, vol. 29(01), pages 145-157, March.
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