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A discussion of the two different aspects of privacy protection in indirect questioning designs

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  • Andreas Quatember

    (Johannes Kepler University JKU Linz)

Abstract

The motivation behind considering the use of indirect questioning designs is their possible positive effect on the respondents’ willingness to cooperate. Whereas the privacy protection objectively offered by these methods has a direct effect on the estimator’s efficiency, it is the subjectively perceived protection which affects the respondents’ willingness to cooperate. For the discussion of these different aspects of privacy protection, a family of randomized response techniques enabling the tailoring of the design’s privacy protection to the respondents is presented as representative of indirect questioning designs. Measures are suggested that formalize how the objectively offered and subjectively perceived privacy protection may differ. Different features of randomized response questioning designs, influencing the perceived privacy protection, are discussed particularly for the “crosswise model” in order to avoid underestimations of the true levels of privacy protection, which would be counter-productive with regard to the respondents’ cooperation propensity.

Suggested Citation

  • Andreas Quatember, 2019. "A discussion of the two different aspects of privacy protection in indirect questioning designs," Quality & Quantity: International Journal of Methodology, Springer, vol. 53(1), pages 269-282, January.
  • Handle: RePEc:spr:qualqt:v:53:y:2019:i:1:d:10.1007_s11135-018-0751-4
    DOI: 10.1007/s11135-018-0751-4
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Andreas Quatember, 2012. "An extension of the standardized randomized response technique to a multi-stage setup," Statistical Methods & Applications, Springer;Società Italiana di Statistica, vol. 21(4), pages 475-484, November.
    2. Andreas Diekmann, 2007. "Not the First Digit! Using Benford's Law to Detect Fraudulent Scientif ic Data," Journal of Applied Statistics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 34(3), pages 321-329.
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    7. Marc Höglinger & Ben Jann & Andreas Diekmann, 2014. "Sensitive Questions in Online Surveys: An Experimental Evaluation of the Randomized Response Technique and the Crosswise Model," University of Bern Social Sciences Working Papers 9, University of Bern, Department of Social Sciences, revised 24 Jun 2014.
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