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articles: A typology of community opportunity and vulnerability in metropolitan Australia

Author

Listed:
  • Patrick Mullins

    () (Department of Sociology, Anthropology and Archaelogy, University of Queensland, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia, 4072)

  • Robert Stimson

    () (School of Geography, Planning and Architecture, University of Queensland, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia, 4072)

  • Kevin O'Connor

    () (Department of Geography and Environmental Sciences, Monash University, Clayton, Victoria, Australia, 3168)

  • Scott Baum

    () (School of Geography, Planning and Architecture, University of Queensland, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia, 4072)

Abstract

A multivariate model using hierarchical clustering and discriminant analysis is used to identify clusters of community opportunity and community vulnerability across Australia's mega metropolitan regions. Variables used in the model measure aspects of structural economic change, occupational change, human capital, income, unemployment, family/household disadvantage, and housing stress. A nine-cluster solution is used to categorise communities across metropolitan space. Significant between -city variations in the incidence of these clusters of opportunity and vulnerability are apparent, suggesting the emergence of marked differentiation between Australia's mega metropolitan regions in their adjustments to changing economic and social conditions.

Suggested Citation

  • Patrick Mullins & Robert Stimson & Kevin O'Connor & Scott Baum, 2001. "articles: A typology of community opportunity and vulnerability in metropolitan Australia," Papers in Regional Science, Springer;Regional Science Association International, vol. 80(1), pages 45-66.
  • Handle: RePEc:spr:presci:v:80:y:2001:i:1:p:45-66 Note: Received: 15 October 1999
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Eichhorst, Anja, 2007. "Evaluating the need assessment in fiscal equalization schemes at the local government level," Journal of Behavioral and Experimental Economics (formerly The Journal of Socio-Economics), Elsevier, vol. 36(5), pages 745-770, October.
    2. Kourtit, K. & Waal, A. de & Nijkamp, P., 2009. "Strategic Performance Management and Creative Industry," Serie Research Memoranda 0020, VU University Amsterdam, Faculty of Economics, Business Administration and Econometrics.
    3. del Campo, Cristina & Monteiro, Carlos M.F. & Soares, Joao Oliveira, 2008. "The European regional policy and the socio-economic diversity of European regions: A multivariate analysis," European Journal of Operational Research, Elsevier, vol. 187(2), pages 600-612, June.
    4. Michael B. Nye & Kate K. Mulvaney, 2016. "Who is Next? Identifying Communities with the Potential for Increased Implementation of Sustainability Policies and Programs," Sustainability, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 8(2), pages 1-18, February.
    5. Alessandra Faggian & M. Rose Olfert & Mark D. Partridge, 2011. "Inferring regional well-being from individual revealed preferences: the 'voting with your feet' approach," Cambridge Journal of Regions, Economy and Society, Cambridge Political Economy Society, vol. 5(1), pages 163-180.
    6. Papadaskalopoulos, Athanasios & Karaganis, Anastasios & Christofakis, Manolis, 2005. "The spatial impact of EU Pan-European transport axes: City clusters formation in the Balkan area and developmental perspectives," Transport Policy, Elsevier, vol. 12(6), pages 488-499, November.

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