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research notes and comments: An alternative approach to developing science parks: A case study from Korea

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  • Dong-Ho Shin

    () (Department of Urban and Regional Planning, Hannam University, 133 Ojung-dong, Taeduk-ku, Taejon, 309-791, Korea)

Abstract

In 1973, the Korean government initiated a plan to establish a major high-technology research complex, called Daeduck Science Park (DSP). The Ministry of Science and Technology (MST) designated 27 square kilometers of land in Taejon, a city of 1.3 million people (1999) for the creation of the park. By 1998, the DSP had grown to host some 60 institutions employing about 12,000 scientists and technicians, and approximately 5000 support staff. This research note reviews the process involved in developing the DSP, evaluates the outcome of the project, and suggests policy alternatives. Data used were collected from a planning project and from interviews with officials of the MST and the DSP Management Office. It can be concluded that the plan for the DSP was successfully implemented and the guidelines contained in the original plan were well observed. Some problems that emerged in the earlier stages, such as a lack of local economic benefits and political input, are now being corrected. The DSP does provide adequate working and residential environments for those who work for the research and educational institutions that contribute to the advancement of the nation's scientific and technological research.

Suggested Citation

  • Dong-Ho Shin, 2001. "research notes and comments: An alternative approach to developing science parks: A case study from Korea," Papers in Regional Science, Springer;Regional Science Association International, vol. 80(1), pages 103-111.
  • Handle: RePEc:spr:presci:v:80:y:2001:i:1:p:103-111 Note: Received: 14 February 2000
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Hassink Robert, 2002. "Südkoreas Regionalentwicklung im Spannungsfeld zwischen nationaler Wirtschaftsentwicklung, Regionalismus und Regionalpolitik," Zeitschrift für Wirtschaftsgeographie, De Gruyter, vol. 46(1), pages 213-227, October.
    2. Albert, Link & U Yeong, Yang, 2017. "On the Growth of Korean Technoparks," UNCG Economics Working Papers 17-7, University of North Carolina at Greensboro, Department of Economics.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    R&D policy; science and technology parks; regional development;

    JEL classification:

    • R11 - Urban, Rural, Regional, Real Estate, and Transportation Economics - - General Regional Economics - - - Regional Economic Activity: Growth, Development, Environmental Issues, and Changes
    • R58 - Urban, Rural, Regional, Real Estate, and Transportation Economics - - Regional Government Analysis - - - Regional Development Planning and Policy

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