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Paternal child care and children's development

Author

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  • Susan L. Averett

    ()

  • Lisa A. Gennetian

    ()

  • H. Elizabeth Peters

    ()

Abstract

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Suggested Citation

  • Susan L. Averett & Lisa A. Gennetian & H. Elizabeth Peters, 2005. "Paternal child care and children's development," Journal of Population Economics, Springer;European Society for Population Economics, vol. 18(3), pages 391-414, September.
  • Handle: RePEc:spr:jopoec:v:18:y:2005:i:3:p:391-414
    DOI: 10.1007/s00148-004-0203-4
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Sepahvand, Mohammad & Shahbazian, Roujman & Bali Swain, Ranjula, 2013. "Time Investment by Parents in Cognitive and Non-cognitive Childcare Activities," Working Paper Series 2013:10, Uppsala University, Department of Economics.
    2. Tindara Addabbo & Maria Laura Di Tommaso & Anna Maccagnan, 2014. "Gender Differences in Italian Children's Capabilities," Feminist Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 20(2), pages 90-121, April.
    3. Daniela Del Boca & Christopher Flinn & Matthew Wiswall, 2014. "Household Choices and Child Development," Review of Economic Studies, Oxford University Press, vol. 81(1), pages 137-185.
    4. Edwin van Gameren & Ingrid Ooms, 2009. "Childcare and labor force participation in the Netherlands: the importance of attitudes and opinions," Review of Economics of the Household, Springer, vol. 7(4), pages 395-421, December.
    5. Rasmussen, Astrid Würtz, 2009. "Allocation of Parental Time and the Long-Term E¤ect on Children's Education," Working Papers 09-22, University of Aarhus, Aarhus School of Business, Department of Economics.
    6. Vincenzo Galasso & Paola Profeta & Chiara Pronzato & Francesco Billari, 2017. "Information and Women’s Intentions: Experimental Evidence About Child Care," European Journal of Population, Springer;European Association for Population Studies, vol. 33(1), pages 109-128, February.
    7. Minagawa Junichi & Upmann Thorsten, 2014. "A Single Parent’s Labor Supply: Evaluating Different Child Care Fees within an Intertemporal Framework," The B.E. Journal of Theoretical Economics, De Gruyter, vol. 14(1), pages 1-39, January.
    8. Daniela Del Boca & Anna Laura Mancini, 2013. "Parental time and child outcomes. Does gender matter?," Questioni di Economia e Finanza (Occasional Papers) 187, Bank of Italy, Economic Research and International Relations Area.
    9. Guyonne Kalb & Thor Thoresen, 2010. "A comparison of family policy designs of Australia and Norway using microsimulation models," Review of Economics of the Household, Springer, vol. 8(2), pages 255-287, June.
    10. Guyonne Kalb, 2009. "Children, Labour Supply and Child Care: Challenges for Empirical Analysis," Australian Economic Review, The University of Melbourne, Melbourne Institute of Applied Economic and Social Research, vol. 42(3), pages 276-299.
    11. Elly-Ann Lindström, 2013. "Gender Bias in Parental Leave: Evidence from Sweden," Journal of Family and Economic Issues, Springer, vol. 34(2), pages 235-248, June.

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