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Child labor and the division of labor in the early English cotton mills

Author

Listed:
  • Douglas A. Galbi

    (Centre for History and Economics, King`s College, Cambridge CB2 1ST, UK)

Abstract

The share of children employed in English cotton factories fell significantly before the introduction of effective child labor legislation in the early 1830s. The early factories employed predominantly children because adults without factory experience were relatively unproductive factory workers. The subsequent growth of the cotton industry fostered the development of a labor market for productive adult factory workers. This effect helps account for the shift toward adults in the cotton factory workforce. JEL classification: J13, N33, O14

Suggested Citation

  • Douglas A. Galbi, 1997. "Child labor and the division of labor in the early English cotton mills," Journal of Population Economics, Springer;European Society for Population Economics, vol. 10(4), pages 357-375.
  • Handle: RePEc:spr:jopoec:v:10:y:1997:i:4:p:357-375
    Note: Received November 3, 1995/Accepted September 20, 1996
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Matthias Doepke & Fabrizio Zilibotti, 2005. "The Macroeconomics of Child Labor Regulation," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 95(5), pages 1492-1524, December.
    2. Edmonds, Eric V., 2008. "Child Labor," Handbook of Development Economics, Elsevier.
    3. Giorgio Bellettini & Carlotta Berti Ceroni & Gianmarco I. P. Ottaviano, 2005. "Child Labour and Resistance to Change," Economica, London School of Economics and Political Science, vol. 72(3), pages 397-411, August.
    4. Dessy, Sylvain E., 2003. "Endogenous Technical Progress and the Emergence of Child Labor Laws," Cahiers de recherche 0302, Université Laval - Département d'économique.
    5. Dessy, Sylvain Éloi, 2002. "A Theory of the Emergence of Compulsory Education Laws," Cahiers de recherche 0209, Université Laval - Département d'économique.
    6. Sonia Bhalotra, 2007. "Is Child Work Necessary?," Oxford Bulletin of Economics and Statistics, Department of Economics, University of Oxford, vol. 69(1), pages 29-55, February.
    7. Drusilla K. Brown & Alan V. Deardorff & Robert M. Stern, 2009. "The Effects of Multinational Production on Wages and Working Conditions in Developing Countries," World Scientific Book Chapters,in: Globalization And International Trade Policies, chapter 17, pages 623-687 World Scientific Publishing Co. Pte. Ltd..
    8. Kaushik Basu, 1999. "Child Labor: Cause, Consequence, and Cure, with Remarks on International Labor Standards," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 37(3), pages 1083-1119, September.
    9. Doepke, Matthias & Zilibotti, Fabrizio, 2003. "Voting with your Children: A Positive Analysis of Child Labour Laws," CEPR Discussion Papers 3733, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    10. repec:nwe:eajour:y:2018:i:3:p:348-372 is not listed on IDEAS
    11. Dessy, Sylvain E., 2000. "A defense of compulsive measures against child labor," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 62(1), pages 261-275, June.
    12. Gitter, Seth R. & Barham, Bradford L., 2007. "Credit, Natural Disasters, Coffee, and Educational Attainment in Rural Honduras," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 35(3), pages 498-511, March.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Child labor · division of labor · Industrial Revolution;

    JEL classification:

    • J13 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Fertility; Family Planning; Child Care; Children; Youth
    • N33 - Economic History - - Labor and Consumers, Demography, Education, Health, Welfare, Income, Wealth, Religion, and Philanthropy - - - Europe: Pre-1913
    • O14 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Industrialization; Manufacturing and Service Industries; Choice of Technology

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