IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/a/spr/jopoec/v10y1997i1p67-85.html
   My bibliography  Save this article

The effects of gender control on fertility and children`s consumption

Author

Listed:
  • James B. Davies

    (Department of Economics, University of Western Ontario, London, Canada N6A 5C2)

  • Junsen Zhang

    (Department of Economics, Chinese University of Hong Kong, Shatin, Hong Kong (Fax:)

Abstract

Effects of sex preference on investments in children`s human capital, bequests and fertility are studied, with and without sex selection, in a model based on parental altruism. Both pure sex preference, a feature of the parental utility function, and indirect preference, which arises from gender-related differences in earnings opportunities, are examined. When there is no gender control the impact of pure sex preference is seen in smaller consumption for daughters than for sons. However, when gender control is exerted, sex preference raises the sex ratio and it is possible that sisters may, on average, consume no less than their more numerous brothers. In an example of the model with specific functional forms, parents who practise gender control have larger families than if sex selection techniques were unavailable. The effect is magnified if sons` earnings opportunities are better than daughters`. JEL classification: D11, J13, J16

Suggested Citation

  • James B. Davies & Junsen Zhang, 1997. "The effects of gender control on fertility and children`s consumption," Journal of Population Economics, Springer;European Society for Population Economics, vol. 10(1), pages 67-85.
  • Handle: RePEc:spr:jopoec:v:10:y:1997:i:1:p:67-85
    Note: Received August 31, 1995 / Accepted May 2, 1996
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://link.springer.de/link/service/journals/00148/papers/7010001/70100067.pdf
    Download Restriction: Access to the full text of the articles in this series is restricted

    File URL: http://link.springer.de/link/service/journals/00148/papers/7010001/70100067.ps.gz
    Download Restriction: Access to the full text of the articles in this series is restricted

    As the access to this document is restricted, you may want to look for a different version below or search for a different version of it.

    Other versions of this item:

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. Claus C Pörtner, 2010. "Sex Selective Abortions, Fertility and Birth Spacing," Working Papers UWEC-2010-04-R, University of Washington, Department of Economics, revised Aug 2010.
    2. He, Qichun, 2018. "Inflation and Fertility in a Schumpeterian Growth Model: Theory and Evidence," MPRA Paper 85074, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    3. N. Picard-Tortorici, 2000. "An Original Framework for Studying Dynamic Fertility Models," THEMA Working Papers 2000-05, THEMA (THéorie Economique, Modélisation et Applications), Université de Cergy-Pontoise.
    4. Michael Leung & Junsen Zhang, 2008. "Gender preference, biased sex ratio, and parental investments in single-child households," Review of Economics of the Household, Springer, vol. 6(2), pages 91-110, June.
    5. Xu, Bing & Pak, Maxwell, 2015. "Gender ratio under China's two-child policy," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 119(C), pages 289-307.
    6. Christine Barnet-Verzat & François-Charles Wolff, 2003. "Choix d'éducation et composition par sexe de la fratrie," Economie & Prévision, La Documentation Française, vol. 157(1), pages 97-118.
    7. Mukherjee, Diganta, 2002. "A new measure of gender bias," ISER Working Paper Series 2002-24, Institute for Social and Economic Research.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Sex preferences · sex selection · fertility · children`s consumption;

    JEL classification:

    • D11 - Microeconomics - - Household Behavior - - - Consumer Economics: Theory
    • J13 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Fertility; Family Planning; Child Care; Children; Youth
    • J16 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Economics of Gender; Non-labor Discrimination

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:spr:jopoec:v:10:y:1997:i:1:p:67-85. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Sonal Shukla) or (Rebekah McClure). General contact details of provider: http://www.springer.com .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    We have no references for this item. You can help adding them by using this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.