IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/a/spr/intere/v42y2007i3p143-155.html
   My bibliography  Save this article

EU Commercial Policy in a Multipolar Trading System

Author

Listed:
  • Simon Evenett

Abstract

In recent years the bipolar multilateral trading system of the post-war years has given way to a multipolar alternative. Although many specifics have yet to be determined, some contours of this new trade policy landscape are coming into focus and in this short essay I examine their implications for the European Union's external commercial policy. Particular attention is given to both the state of business-government relations and the propensity to liberalise under the auspices of reciprocal trade agreements by Brazil, India, and China; the potential new poles of the world trading system. I consider the likely consequences of these developments, plus factors internal to both the European Union and the United States, for the possible content of future multilateral trade initiatives.
(This abstract was borrowed from another version of this item.)

Suggested Citation

  • Simon Evenett, 2007. "EU Commercial Policy in a Multipolar Trading System," Intereconomics: Review of European Economic Policy, Springer;German National Library of Economics;Centre for European Policy Studies (CEPS), vol. 42(3), pages 143-155, May.
  • Handle: RePEc:spr:intere:v:42:y:2007:i:3:p:143-155 DOI: 10.1007/s10272-007-0217-8
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10.1007/s10272-007-0217-8
    Download Restriction: Access to full text is restricted to subscribers.

    As the access to this document is restricted, you may want to look for a different version below or search for a different version of it.

    Other versions of this item:

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Malerba, Franco, 1992. "Learning by Firms and Incremental Technical Change," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 102(413), pages 845-859, July.
    2. Robert E. Hall & Charles I. Jones, 1999. "Why do Some Countries Produce So Much More Output Per Worker than Others?," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 114(1), pages 83-116.
    3. Balmann, Alfons & Odening, Martin & Weikard, Hans-Peter & Brandes, Wilhelm, 1996. "Path-dependence without increasing returns to scale and network externalities," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 29(1), pages 159-172, January.
    4. Atkinson, Anthony B & Stiglitz, Joseph E, 1969. "A New View of Technological Change," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 79(315), pages 573-578, September.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. Silja Baller & Gregory Sergi, 2008. "A Negotiator's Guide to Regional Trade Agreements : Considerations from an East Asian Perspective," World Bank Other Operational Studies 6279, The World Bank.
    2. Çakır, Mustafa Yavuz & Kabundi, Alain, 2013. "Trade shocks from BRIC to South Africa: A global VAR analysis," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 32(C), pages 190-202.
    3. Gerrit Faber & Jan Orbie, 2009. "Everything But Arms: Much More than Appears at First Sight," Journal of Common Market Studies, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 47, pages 767-787, September.
    4. Pierluigi Montalbano & Silvia Nenci, 2014. "The Trade Competitiveness of Southern Emerging Economies: A Multidimensional Approach Through Cluster Analysis," The World Economy, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 37(6), pages 783-810, June.
    5. World Bank, 2008. "A Negotiator's Guide to Regional Trade Agreements : Considerations from an East Asian Perspective," World Bank Other Operational Studies 8034, The World Bank.

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • F13 - International Economics - - Trade - - - Trade Policy; International Trade Organizations
    • F15 - International Economics - - Trade - - - Economic Integration

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:spr:intere:v:42:y:2007:i:3:p:143-155. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Sonal Shukla) or (Rebekah McClure). General contact details of provider: http://www.springer.com .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    We have no references for this item. You can help adding them by using this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.