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The stability of German money demand: Not just a myth

Author

Listed:
  • Michael Scharnagl

    () (Deutsche Bundesbank, Wilhelm-Epstein-Str. 14, D-60431 Frankfurt/Main, Germany)

Abstract

The stability of German money demand has been analyzed in a series of papers in recent years, especially since unification. In this paper the critical question of stability is reviewed, using various estimation techniques and testing procedures for long-run stability. To take financial innovations into account, the opportunity cost measure is calculated by differentiating between traditional savings deposits and special savings facilities, which are a major form of financial innovation in Germany. Overall, there are strong indications of a stable long-run money-demand relationship.

Suggested Citation

  • Michael Scharnagl, 1998. "The stability of German money demand: Not just a myth," Empirical Economics, Springer, vol. 23(3), pages 355-370.
  • Handle: RePEc:spr:empeco:v:23:y:1998:i:3:p:355-370
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Carstensen Kai & Hansen Gerd, 2004. "Inflationäre Schocks in Deutschland: Eine Common Trends Analyse / Inflationary Shocks in Germany: A Common Trends Analysis," Journal of Economics and Statistics (Jahrbuecher fuer Nationaloekonomie und Statistik), De Gruyter, vol. 224(3), pages 271-291, June.
    2. Helmut Luetkepohl & Jürgen Wolters, 2001. "The Transmission of German Monetary Policy in the Pre-Euro Period," CESifo Working Paper Series 604, CESifo Group Munich.
    3. Wieland, Volker, 2000. "Monetary policy, parameter uncertainty and optimal learning," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 46(1), pages 199-228, August.
    4. Kai Carstensen & Jan Hagen & Oliver Hossfeld & Abelardo Salazar Neaves, 2009. "Money Demand Stability And Inflation Prediction In The Four Largest Emu Countries," Scottish Journal of Political Economy, Scottish Economic Society, vol. 56(1), pages 73-93, February.
    5. Ralph Setzer & Guntram Wolff, 2013. "Money demand in the euro area: new insights from disaggregated data," International Economics and Economic Policy, Springer, vol. 10(2), pages 297-315, June.
    6. Budina, Nina & Maliszewski, Wojciech & de Menil, Georges & Turlea, Geomina, 2006. "Money, inflation and output in Romania, 1992-2000," Journal of International Money and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 25(2), pages 330-347, March.
    7. Lee, Chien-Chiang & Chang, Chun-Ping & Chen, Pei-Fen, 2008. "Money demand function versus monetary integration: Revisiting panel cointegration among GCC countries," Mathematics and Computers in Simulation (MATCOM), Elsevier, vol. 79(1), pages 85-93.
    8. Franz Seitz & Karl-Heinz Tödter, 2001. "How the P* Model Rationalizes Monetary Targeting: A Comment on Svensson," German Economic Review, Verein für Socialpolitik, vol. 2(3), pages 303-308, August.
    9. Roberto Golinelli & Sergio Pastorello, 2002. "Modelling the demand for M3 in the Euro area," The European Journal of Finance, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 8(4), pages 371-401.
    10. Gerberding, Christina & Seitz, Franz & Worms, Andreas, 2007. "Money-based interest rate rules: lessons from German data," Discussion Paper Series 1: Economic Studies 2007,06, Deutsche Bundesbank.
    11. Calza, Alessandro & Sousa, João, 2003. "Why has broad money demand been more stable in the euro area than in other economies? A literature review," Working Paper Series 261, European Central Bank.
    12. Dreger, Christian & Schumacher, Christian, 2002. "Estimating large-scale factor models for economic activity in Germany : do they outperform simpler models?," HWWA Discussion Papers 199, Hamburg Institute of International Economics (HWWA).

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Money demand · stability tests · financial innovations;

    JEL classification:

    • C22 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Single Equation Models; Single Variables - - - Time-Series Models; Dynamic Quantile Regressions; Dynamic Treatment Effect Models; Diffusion Processes
    • C51 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Econometric Modeling - - - Model Construction and Estimation
    • C52 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Econometric Modeling - - - Model Evaluation, Validation, and Selection

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