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Migration differentials by education and occupation: Trends and variations

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  • Larry Long

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  • Larry Long, 1973. "Migration differentials by education and occupation: Trends and variations," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 10(2), pages 243-258, May.
  • Handle: RePEc:spr:demogr:v:10:y:1973:i:2:p:243-258
    DOI: 10.2307/2060816
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Various, 1971. "Conferences on Research," NBER Chapters,in: New Directions in Economic Research, pages 144-148 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    2. Various, 1971. "Staff Reports on Research Under Way," NBER Chapters,in: New Directions in Economic Research, pages 71-143 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
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    Cited by:

    1. Ather Maqsood Ahmed & Ismail Sirageldin, 1993. "Socio-economic Determinants of Labour Mobility in Pakistan," The Pakistan Development Review, Pakistan Institute of Development Economics, vol. 32(2), pages 139-157.
    2. Karen M. King, 2011. "Technology, Talent and Tolerance and Inter-regional Migration in Canada," Chapters,in: Handbook of Creative Cities, chapter 9 Edward Elgar Publishing.
    3. Bohyun Jang & John Casterline & Anastasia Snyder, 2014. "Migration and marriage: Modeling the joint process," Demographic Research, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany, vol. 30(47), pages 1339-1366, April.
    4. Alfred Nucci & Charles Tolbert & Troy Blanchard & Michael Irwin, 2002. "Leaving Home: Modeling the Effect of Civic and Economic Structure on Individual Migration Patterns," Working Papers 02-16, Center for Economic Studies, U.S. Census Bureau.
    5. Joshua L. Rosenbloom & William A. Sundstrom, 2003. "The Decline and Rise of Interstate Migration in the United States: Evidence from the IPUMS, 1850-1990," NBER Working Papers 9857, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    6. Fendel Tanja, 2016. "Migration and Regional Wage Disparities in Germany," Journal of Economics and Statistics (Jahrbuecher fuer Nationaloekonomie und Statistik), De Gruyter, vol. 236(1), pages 3-35, February.
    7. Stuart Sweeney & Harvey A. Goldstein, 1998. "The effects of regional out-migration on job openings by occupation," ERSA conference papers ersa98p353, European Regional Science Association.
    8. White, Nancy E. & Wolaver, Amy M., 2003. "Occupation Choice, Information, and Migration," The Review of Regional Studies, Southern Regional Science Association, vol. 33(2), pages 142-163.
    9. Pablo Neudörfer & Jorge Dresdner, 2014. "Does religious affiliation affect migration?," Papers in Regional Science, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 93(3), pages 577-594, August.

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