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Product innovation with lumpy investment

Author

Listed:
  • M. Chahim

    () (Netherlands Organisation for Applied Scientific Research (TNO))

  • D. Grass

    () (Vienna University of Technology)

  • R. F. Hartl

    () (University of Vienna)

  • P. M. Kort

    () (University of Antwerp
    Tilburg University)

Abstract

Abstract The paper provides a framework that enables us to analyze the important topic of capital accumulation under technological progress. We describe an algorithm to solve Impulse Control problems, based on a (multipoint) boundary value problem approach. Investment takes place in lumps and we determine the optimal timing of technology adoptions as well as the size of the corresponding investments. Our numerical approach led to some guidelines for new technology investments. First, we find that investments are larger and occur in a later stadium when more of the old capital stock needs to be scrapped. Moreover, we obtain that the size of the firm’s investments increase when the technology produces more profitable products. We see that the firm in the beginning of the planning period adopts new technologies faster as time proceeds, but later on the opposite happens. Furthermore, we find that the firm does not invest such that marginal profit is zero, but instead marginal profit is negative.

Suggested Citation

  • M. Chahim & D. Grass & R. F. Hartl & P. M. Kort, 2017. "Product innovation with lumpy investment," Central European Journal of Operations Research, Springer;Slovak Society for Operations Research;Hungarian Operational Research Society;Czech Society for Operations Research;Österr. Gesellschaft für Operations Research (ÖGOR);Slovenian Society Informatika - Section for Operational Research;Croatian Operational Research Society, vol. 25(1), pages 159-182, March.
  • Handle: RePEc:spr:cejnor:v:25:y:2017:i:1:d:10.1007_s10100-015-0432-5
    DOI: 10.1007/s10100-015-0432-5
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Boucekkine, Raouf & Saglam, Cagri & Vall Ee, Thomas, 2004. "Technology Adoption Under Embodiment: A Two-Stage Optimal Control Approach," Macroeconomic Dynamics, Cambridge University Press, vol. 8(02), pages 250-271, April.
    2. Chahim, Mohammed & Hartl, Richard F. & Kort, Peter M., 2012. "A tutorial on the deterministic Impulse Control Maximum Principle: Necessary and sufficient optimality conditions," European Journal of Operational Research, Elsevier, vol. 219(1), pages 18-26.
    3. Feichtinger, Gustav & Hartl, Richard F. & Kort, Peter M. & Veliov, Vladimir M., 2006. "Anticipation effects of technological progress on capital accumulation: a vintage capital approach," Journal of Economic Theory, Elsevier, vol. 126(1), pages 143-164, January.
    4. Grass, D. & Chahim, M., 2012. "Numerical Algorithms for Deterministic Impulse Control Models with Applications," Discussion Paper 2012-081, Tilburg University, Center for Economic Research.
    5. Luhmer, Alfred, 1986. "A continuous time, deterministic, nonstationary model of economic ordering," European Journal of Operational Research, Elsevier, vol. 24(1), pages 123-135, January.
    6. Greenwood, Jeremy & Hercowitz, Zvi & Krusell, Per, 1997. "Long-Run Implications of Investment-Specific Technological Change," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 87(3), pages 342-362, June.
    7. Grass, D., 2012. "Numerical computation of the optimal vector field: Exemplified by a fishery model," Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control, Elsevier, vol. 36(10), pages 1626-1658.
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    (multipoint) Boundary value problem (BVP); Discrete continuous system; Impulse control maximum principle; Optimal Control; Product innovation; Retrofitting; state-jumps;

    JEL classification:

    • C61 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Mathematical Methods; Programming Models; Mathematical and Simulation Modeling - - - Optimization Techniques; Programming Models; Dynamic Analysis
    • D90 - Microeconomics - - Micro-Based Behavioral Economics - - - General
    • O33 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Innovation; Research and Development; Technological Change; Intellectual Property Rights - - - Technological Change: Choices and Consequences; Diffusion Processes

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