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Coup-Proofing and Military Effectiveness in Interstate Wars, 1967–99

Author

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  • Ulrich Pilster
  • Tobias Böhmelt

Abstract

This study examines the influence of civil–military relations on military effectiveness. More specifically, we investigate how coup-proofing, that is, the strategies and tactics employed to prevent the military from seizing power, affects battlefield performance. The main argument claims that coup-proofing has a negative impact on soldiers’ leadership qualities, initiative, and the ability to coordinate different military units. Ultimately, the higher a country’s coup-proofing efforts relative to its opponent, the worse its effectiveness on the battlefield. We test this hypothesis using data on battlefield outcomes and coup-proofing between 1967 and 1999.

Suggested Citation

  • Ulrich Pilster & Tobias Böhmelt, 2011. "Coup-Proofing and Military Effectiveness in Interstate Wars, 1967–99," Conflict Management and Peace Science, Peace Science Society (International), vol. 28(4), pages 331-350, September.
  • Handle: RePEc:sae:compsc:v:28:y:2011:i:4:p:331-350
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    Cited by:

    1. Aney, Madhav S. & Ko, Giovanni, 2015. "Expropriation risk and competition within the military," European Journal of Political Economy, Elsevier, vol. 39(C), pages 125-149.
    2. Beger, Andreas & Dorff, Cassy L. & Ward, Michael D., 2016. "Irregular leadership changes in 2014: Forecasts using ensemble, split-population duration models," International Journal of Forecasting, Elsevier, vol. 32(1), pages 98-111.
    3. repec:taf:defpea:v:27:y:2016:i:5:p:609-625 is not listed on IDEAS
    4. Vincenzo Bove & Jennifer Brauner, 2016. "The demand for military expenditure in authoritarian regimes," Defence and Peace Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 27(5), pages 609-625, September.

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