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Gauging the Magnitude of Civilization Conflict

  • Glynn Ellis

    (Georgia Southern University, USA)

Registered author(s):

    Multiple studies of Huntington’s suggestion of a clash of civilizations have found no support for it. This study does not reanalyze his thesis, but rather focuses on specific features of the different-civilization conflict he theorizes about. Using empirical analysis I find that different-civilization conflict is more prevalent than same-civilization conflict, and is therefore appropriate for continued scholarly examination. Even so, I conclude that over time it is not only shrinking as a percentage of the overall world conflict as previously reported but is doing so at a rate more pronounced than heretofore realized. My results support Roeder’s findings that the most contentious civilizations are the West, Orthodox, and Islam, with Western states as a group being more contentious than the other two. As for a most contentious civilization dyad, I find the probability of conflict to be about the same for Western-Islamic and Western-Orthodox states. Finally, I conclude that the contentiousness of Western states derives in large part from their tendency to band together or cooperate during violent conflict.

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    File URL: http://cmp.sagepub.com/content/27/3/219.abstract
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    Article provided by Peace Science Society (International) in its journal Conflict Management and Peace Science.

    Volume (Year): 27 (2010)
    Issue (Month): 3 (July)
    Pages: 219-238

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    Handle: RePEc:sae:compsc:v:27:y:2010:i:3:p:219-238
    Contact details of provider: Web page: http://pss.la.psu.edu/

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