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Limited Impact of the EU on Candidate States:Turkey’s Employment Policy

Author

Listed:
  • Hakan Cavlak

    (Faculty of Economics and Administrative Sciences, University of Namık Kemal, Turkey)

  • Davuthan Gunaydın

    (Faculty of Economics and Administrative Sciences, University of Namık Kemal, Turkey)

Abstract

The employment policy is one of the most disputable areas between Turkey and the EU. The EU declared two opening conditions, one about union rights and the other one about preparing an action plan displaying step by step the transposing of EU laws. Although Turkey claims that she met those criteria, the EU insists on keeping the accession negotiations in this area closed. However, there is serious gap between Turkish and European employment policies and in order to comply with the EU’s, there is a strong need of enthusiasm in Turkey for proper implementation of changes made in legal and institutional structures. Simultaneously, the EU has to offer a considerable incentive, e.g. membership, for Turkey to encourage her to adapt EU rules in employment policy. Unfortunately, it is argued in this paper that the current situation is the opposite, i.e. there is no substantial incentive from the EU to encourage Turkey and thus, no enthusiasm from Turkey to comply with the EU policy. In order to analyze the impact of the EU on Turkey’s employment policy the main question designed in this paper is: ‘To what extent does the EU have influence on policy convergence in a candidate country that does not have a clear membership perspective? ‘. It is argued in this study that “without a concrete incentive, European Union’s impact on a candidate country would be limited†. Thus, the patterns of policy change at the national level are the dependent variable to be observed. The European Union’s conditionality is the independent variable that is expected to alter the national patterns. Key Words:EU, Conditionality, Institutionalizm, Europeanization, Employment Policy

Suggested Citation

  • Hakan Cavlak & Davuthan Gunaydın, 2015. "Limited Impact of the EU on Candidate States:Turkey’s Employment Policy," International Journal of Research in Business and Social Science (2147-4478), Center for the Strategic Studies in Business and Finance, vol. 4(4), pages 01-14, October.
  • Handle: RePEc:rbs:ijbrss:v:4:y:2015:i:4:p:01-14
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Steunenberg, Bernard & Dimitrova, Antoaneta, 2007. "Compliance in the EU enlargement process: The limits of conditionality," European Integration online Papers (EIoP), European Community Studies Association Austria (ECSA-A), vol. 11, June.
    2. Bernard Steunenberg & Antoaneta Dimitrova, 2007. "Compliance in the EU Enlargement Process: Institutional Reform and the Limits of Conditionality," Chapters, in: Alain Marciano & Jean-Michel Josselin (ed.), Democracy, Freedom and Coercion, chapter 10, Edward Elgar Publishing.
    3. Kelley, Judith, 2004. "International Actors on the Domestic Scene: Membership Conditionality and Socialization by International Institutions," International Organization, Cambridge University Press, vol. 58(3), pages 425-457, July.
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