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Anfaenge einer Institutionalisierung grenzueberschreitender Arbeitsbeziehungen? Zur Paradoxie der Internationalen Rahmenabkommen im globalen Dienstleistungssektor (Regulation of Labour in Project Networks: A Structurationist Analysis)

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  • Helfen, Markus
  • Fichter, Michael Joerg Sydow
  • Sydow, Joerg

Abstract

Im Zentrum des Beitrages steht die paradoxe Beobachtung, dass Internationalisierungsphaenomene bei arbeitsintensiven, unternehmensbezogenen Dienstleistungen haeufig mit einem Verfall der arbeitspolitischen Institutionen in Verbindung gebracht werden, es aber gleichwohl Internationale Rahmenabkommen zwischen globalen Dienstleistungsunternehmen und dem zustaendigen globalem Gewerkschaftsdachverband gibt. Anhand einer exemplarischen Fallstudie wird herausgearbeitet, dass vor allem ein Zusammenfallen von zwei Aspekten den paradoxen Abschluss von Internationalen Rahmenabkommen in arbeitsintensiven Dienstleistungssegmenten beguenstigt: Erstens auf Seiten der globalen Gewerkschaft ein Verhandlungskonzept, das ausgehend von den niedrigen Organisationsgraden in den betroffenen Branchen „Organizing“ zum Gegenstand der Aushandlung macht und zweitens auf Seiten des zentralen Managements ein besonderer Legitimationsbedarf des Geschaeftsmodells bei gleichzeitig erhoehter Sichtbarkeit des Unternehmens. (This article directs attention to the paradoxical observation that while the deterioration of (national) industrial relations institutions and labour standards are often found in conjunction with the internationalization of labour-intensive industrial services there are unique cases of global (framework) agreements in this sector. These agreements have been concluded between the global union federation representing the private service industries, and several large multinationals. Using an exemplary case study, we argue that a combination of two aspects facilitates the paradoxical conclusion of global agreements in labour-intensive services: First, for the global union federation, a negotiation strategy that focuses on how to support “organizing” in order to tackle low unionization rates in the sector, and second, for central management, pressure to legitimize and further a particular business model owing to the high-profile visibility of their respective companies.)

Suggested Citation

  • Helfen, Markus & Fichter, Michael Joerg Sydow & Sydow, Joerg, 2012. "Anfaenge einer Institutionalisierung grenzueberschreitender Arbeitsbeziehungen? Zur Paradoxie der Internationalen Rahmenabkommen im globalen Dienstleistungssektor (Regulation of Labour in Project Netw," Industrielle Beziehungen - Zeitschrift fuer Arbeit, Organisation und Management - The German Journal of Industrial Relations, Rainer Hampp Verlag, vol. 19(3), pages 290-313.
  • Handle: RePEc:rai:indbez:doi_10.1688/1862-0035_indb_2012_03_helfen
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    Keywords

    international (global) framework agreements; global union federations; ILO labour standards; service multinationals; corporate social responsibility;

    JEL classification:

    • J83 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Labor Standards - - - Workers' Rights
    • L84 - Industrial Organization - - Industry Studies: Services - - - Personal, Professional, and Business Services
    • M16 - Business Administration and Business Economics; Marketing; Accounting; Personnel Economics - - Business Administration - - - International Business Administration

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