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Bank Loans to Newly Public Firms

  • Sherrill Shaffer

    (University of Wyoming)

  • Tatyana Sokolyk

    (Brock University)

Prior studies have shown that newly public firms exhibit a high degree of uncertainty and asymmetric information, with few reliable sources of information. These findings suggest that investors could benefit if some independent party is able to assess the quality of a newly public firm. Since other studies have found that banks can reduce information asymmetry about firms that borrow, we examine whether banks provide information about the quality of newly public firms. We find that bank lending is consistently associated with positive long-term outcomes-newly public firms that borrow experience significantly smaller decreases in operating performance and better long-term stock performance than non-borrowers.

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Article provided by Pepperdine University, Graziadio School of Business and Management in its journal Journal of Entrepreneurial Finance.

Volume (Year): 16 (2013)
Issue (Month): 2 (Spring)
Pages: 33-56

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Handle: RePEc:pep:journl:v:16:y:2013:i:2:p:33-56
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Web page: http://bschool.pepperdine.edu/jef

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  1. Lummer, Scott L. & McConnell, John J., 1989. "Further evidence on the bank lending process and the capital-market response to bank loan agreements," Journal of Financial Economics, Elsevier, vol. 25(1), pages 99-122, November.
  2. Billett, Matthew T. & Flannery, Mark J. & Garfinkel, Jon A., 2006. "Are Bank Loans Special? Evidence on the Post-Announcement Performance of Bank Borrowers," Journal of Financial and Quantitative Analysis, Cambridge University Press, vol. 41(04), pages 733-751, December.
  3. Campbell, Tim S & Kracaw, William A, 1980. " Information Production, Market Signalling, and the Theory of Financial Intermediation," Journal of Finance, American Finance Association, vol. 35(4), pages 863-82, September.
  4. Rajan, Raghuram & Winton, Andrew, 1995. " Covenants and Collateral as Incentives to Monitor," Journal of Finance, American Finance Association, vol. 50(4), pages 1113-46, September.
  5. Diamond, Douglas W, 1991. "Monitoring and Reputation: The Choice between Bank Loans and Directly Placed Debt," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 99(4), pages 689-721, August.
  6. James S. Ang & James C. Brau, 2002. "Firm Transparency and the Costs of Going Public," Journal of Financial Research, Southern Finance Association;Southwestern Finance Association, vol. 25(1), pages 1-17.
  7. Gonzalez, Laura & James, Christopher, 2007. "Banks and bubbles: How good are bankers at spotting winners?," Journal of Financial Economics, Elsevier, vol. 86(1), pages 40-70, October.
  8. Diamond, Douglas W, 1984. "Financial Intermediation and Delegated Monitoring," Review of Economic Studies, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 51(3), pages 393-414, July.
  9. Mikkelson, Wayne H. & Partch, M. Megan, 1986. "Valuation effects of security offerings and the issuance process," Journal of Financial Economics, Elsevier, vol. 15(1-2), pages 31-60.
  10. Lin, Hsiou-wei & McNichols, Maureen F., 1998. "Underwriting relationships, analysts' earnings forecasts and investment recommendations," Journal of Accounting and Economics, Elsevier, vol. 25(1), pages 101-127, February.
  11. Berlin, Mitchell & Loeys, Jan, 1988. " Bond Covenants and Delegated Monitoring," Journal of Finance, American Finance Association, vol. 43(2), pages 397-412, June.
  12. Ramakrishnan, Ram T S & Thakor, Anjan V, 1984. "Information Reliability and a Theory of Financial Intermediation," Review of Economic Studies, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 51(3), pages 415-32, July.
  13. Black, Fischer, 1975. "Bank funds management in an efficient market," Journal of Financial Economics, Elsevier, vol. 2(4), pages 323-339, December.
  14. Siew Hong Teoh & T. J. Wong, 2002. "Why New Issues and High-Accrual Firms Underperform: The Role of Analysts' Credulity," Review of Financial Studies, Society for Financial Studies, vol. 15(3), pages 869-900.
  15. James, Christopher, 1987. "Some evidence on the uniqueness of bank loans," Journal of Financial Economics, Elsevier, vol. 19(2), pages 217-235, December.
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