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Industrial Relations in Workplaces Employing Indigenous Australians

Author

Listed:
  • Boyd Hunter

    () (Australian National University)

  • A.E. Hawke

    (Australian National University)

Abstract

Despite the widespread industrial relations reform of the last decade, little attention has been paid to the plight of groups traditionally disadvantaged in the labour market—including Indigenous people. The Australian Workplace Industrial Relations Survey (AWIRS) 1995 is the first data set that permits a direct examination of firms that employ Indigenous Australians. One disturbing finding is that many workplaces with Indigenous employees appear to have chosen the ‘low-wage’ strategy. The fact that such workplaces are more likely to pay award wages indicates the importance to Indigenous people of ensuring award minimums remain current, and that enterprise bargains do not become the sole means of altering wages and conditions.

Suggested Citation

  • Boyd Hunter & A.E. Hawke, 2002. "Industrial Relations in Workplaces Employing Indigenous Australians," Australian Journal of Labour Economics (AJLE), Bankwest Curtin Economics Centre (BCEC), Curtin Business School, vol. 5(3), pages 373-395, September.
  • Handle: RePEc:ozl:journl:v:5:y:2002:i:3:p:373-395
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    Cited by:

    1. Gray, Matthew & Hunter, Boyd, 2005. "Indigenous Job Search Success," MPRA Paper 1393, University Library of Munich, Germany.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Economics of Minorities and Races Conflict Resolution Dispute Resolution Discrimination;

    JEL classification:

    • J15 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Economics of Minorities, Races, Indigenous Peoples, and Immigrants; Non-labor Discrimination
    • D74 - Microeconomics - - Analysis of Collective Decision-Making - - - Conflict; Conflict Resolution; Alliances; Revolutions
    • J52 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Labor-Management Relations, Trade Unions, and Collective Bargaining - - - Dispute Resolution: Strikes, Arbitration, and Mediation
    • J71 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Labor Discrimination - - - Hiring and Firing

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