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Executive Control and Legislative Success

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  • Daniel Diermeier
  • Razvan Vlaicu

Abstract

The higher legislative success of parliamentary governments relative to presidential governments has been used to argue that legislative success is driven by parliamentary governments' superior agenda power or their control of legislative majorities. We show that this approach is at odds with some of the empirical regularities across and within political systems. We then propose a legislative bargaining model to elucidate this puzzle. In the model, the policies of a confidence-dependent parliamentary government enjoy more predictable support from governing coalition members because their short-term policy goals are less important than the government's survival. Coalition support is stronger when the government has more agenda power and is weaker with a larger ruling coalition. We explore the empirical implications of these findings and their consequences for the comparative study of legislative institutions. Copyright 2011, Oxford University Press.

Suggested Citation

  • Daniel Diermeier & Razvan Vlaicu, 2011. "Executive Control and Legislative Success," Review of Economic Studies, Oxford University Press, vol. 78(3), pages 846-871.
  • Handle: RePEc:oup:restud:v:78:y:2011:i:3:p:846-871
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    File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10.1093/restud/rdq030
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    Cited by:

    1. Vlaicu, Razvan & Verhoeven, Marijn & Grigoli, Francesco & Mills, Zachary, 2014. "Multiyear budgets and fiscal performance: Panel data evidence," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 111(C), pages 79-95.
    2. Buisseret, Peter, 2013. "A Political Economy of the Separation of Electoral Origin," The Warwick Economics Research Paper Series (TWERPS) 1021, University of Warwick, Department of Economics.
    3. Stone, Daniel F., 2013. "Media and gridlock," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 101(C), pages 94-104.
    4. Michela Cella & Giovanna Iannantuoni & Elena Manzoni, 2015. "Do The Right Thing. A comparison of politicians' incentives across constitutional systems," Working Papers 290, University of Milano-Bicocca, Department of Economics, revised Jan 2015.
    5. Michela Cella & Giovanna Iannantuoni & Elena Manzoni, 2014. "Constitutional Rules and Efficient Policies," Working Papers 270, University of Milano-Bicocca, Department of Economics, revised Mar 2014.
    6. Luca Bettarelli & Michela Cella & Giovanna Iannantuoni & Elena Manzoni, 2015. "It's a matter of confidence: Institutions, government stability and economic outcomes," Working Papers 309, University of Milano-Bicocca, Department of Economics, revised Sep 2015.
    7. Bettareli, Luca & Cella, Michela & Iannantuoni, Giovanna & Manzoni, Elena, 2017. "It's a matter of confidence: Institutions, government stability and economic outcomes," MPRA Paper 77546, University Library of Munich, Germany.

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