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Industrial Restructuring and Regional Policy

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  • Wren, Colin
  • Taylor, Jim

Abstract

The paper examines the changing regional specialization of U.K. employment over the period 1971-94, analyzing the extent to which U.K. regional policy has altered the industrial structure of the Assisted Area regions, making them less vulnerable to economic change. All regional economies are found to have become more specialized, but industry has become less geographically concentrated leading to a convergence of regional industrial structures towards the national pattern of employment. These trends are stronger in the Assisted Areas, and have been promoted by the operation of regional policy, but the major policy effect occurs through the large-scale capital grants which have accelerated the employment decline of the traditional manufacturing industries in which the Assisted Areas were relatively over-represented. Copyright 1999 by Royal Economic Society.

Suggested Citation

  • Wren, Colin & Taylor, Jim, 1999. "Industrial Restructuring and Regional Policy," Oxford Economic Papers, Oxford University Press, vol. 51(3), pages 487-516, July.
  • Handle: RePEc:oup:oxecpp:v:51:y:1999:i:3:p:487-516
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    Cited by:

    1. Criscuolo, Chiara & Martin, Ralf & Overman, Henry & Van Reenen, John, 2012. "The Causal Effects of an Industrial Policy," IZA Discussion Papers 6323, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    2. Jonathan Jones & Colin Wren, 2011. "On the Relative Importance of Agglomeration Economies in the Location of FDI Across British Regions," SERC Discussion Papers 0089, Spatial Economics Research Centre, LSE.
    3. Martin Robson, 2006. "Sectoral shifts, employment specialization and the efficiency of matching: An analysis using UK regional data," Regional Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 40(7), pages 743-754.
    4. Enrico Moretti, 2014. "Local Economic Development, Agglomeration Economies, and the Big Push: 100 Years of Evidence from the Tennessee Valley Authority," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 129(1), pages 275-331.
    5. Gore, Tony & Wells, Peter, 2009. "Governance and evaluation: The case of EU regional policy horizontal priorities," Evaluation and Program Planning, Elsevier, vol. 32(2), pages 158-167, May.
    6. Çiğdem Börke Tunali & Jan Fidrmuc, 2015. "State Aid Policy in the European Union," Journal of Common Market Studies, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 53(5), pages 1143-1162, September.
    7. Colin Wren & Jonathan Jones, 2011. "Assessing The Regional Impact Of Grants On Fdi Location: Evidence From U.K. Regional Policy, 1985–2005," Journal of Regional Science, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 51(3), pages 497-517, August.
    8. Harvey Armstrong, 2001. "Regional Selective Assistance: Is the Spend Enough and Is It Targeting the Right Places?," Regional Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 35(3), pages 247-257.
    9. H. W. Armstrong & B. Kehrer & P. Wells, 2001. "Initial Impacts of Community Economic Development Initiatives in the Yorkshire and Humber Structural Funds Programme," Regional Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 35(8), pages 673-688.
    10. Marelli, Enrico, 2004. "Evolution of employment structures and regional specialisation in the EU," Economic Systems, Elsevier, vol. 28(1), pages 35-59, March.

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