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Cross-National Comparisons of the Labour Force Participation of Women Married to Unemployed Men

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  • Dex, Shirley, et al

Abstract

This paper estimates a cross-sectional model of married women's labor-force participation for five countries--Britain, Denmark, the United States, Sweden, and Ireland--using data from the 1980s. The model includes a linearized budget constraint and an instrumented wage variable. Dummy variables were entered for the benefit regimes that unemployed husbands were experiencing. The five countries between them had a range of means-tested and other benefit regimes for unemployed men. The results suggest that non-means-tested regimes do not affect wives' participation whereas means-tested regimes all lower wives participation rates, given their characteristics. Coauthors are Siv Gustafsson, Nina Smith, and Tim Callan. Copyright 1995 by Royal Economic Society.

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  • Dex, Shirley, et al, 1995. "Cross-National Comparisons of the Labour Force Participation of Women Married to Unemployed Men," Oxford Economic Papers, Oxford University Press, vol. 47(4), pages 611-635, October.
  • Handle: RePEc:oup:oxecpp:v:47:y:1995:i:4:p:611-35
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    Cited by:

    1. Prieto-Rodriguez, Juan & Rodriguez-Gutierrez, Cesar, 2003. "Participation of married women in the European labor markets and the "added worker effect"," Journal of Behavioral and Experimental Economics (formerly The Journal of Socio-Economics), Elsevier, vol. 32(4), pages 429-446, September.
    2. Aedin Doris, 1999. "The Effect of the Means Testing of Venefits on Household Income and the Incentives to Work of the Wives of Unemployed Men," Economics, Finance and Accounting Department Working Paper Series n870499, Department of Economics, Finance and Accounting, National University of Ireland - Maynooth.
    3. Aaberge, Rolf, et al, 2000. " Unemployment Shocks and Income Distribution: How Did the Nordic Countries Fare during Their Crises?," Scandinavian Journal of Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 102(1), pages 77-99, March.
    4. Bredtmann, Julia & Otten, Sebastian & Rulff, Christian, 2014. "Husband's Unemployment and Wife's Labor Supply – The Added Worker Effect across Europe," Ruhr Economic Papers 484, RWI - Leibniz-Institut für Wirtschaftsforschung, Ruhr-University Bochum, TU Dortmund University, University of Duisburg-Essen.
    5. Helena Skyt, Nielsen & Verner, Mette, 2003. "Why are Well-educated Women not Full-timers?," Working Papers 03-8, University of Aarhus, Aarhus School of Business, Department of Economics.
    6. Hämäläinen, Kari & Ollikainen, Virve, 2004. "Differential Effects of Active Labour Market Programmes in the Early Stages of Young People's Unemployment," Research Reports 115, VATT Institute for Economic Research.
    7. Nidhiya Menon & Yana van der Meulen Rodgers, 2010. "War and Women’s Work: Evidence from the Conflict in Nepal," Working Papers 19, Brandeis University, Department of Economics and International Businesss School.
    8. Russell, Helen & Layte, Richard & Maitre, Bertrand & O'Connell, Philip J. & Whelan, Christopher T., 2004. "Work-Poor Households: The Welfare Implications of Changing Household Employment Patterns," Research Series, Economic and Social Research Institute (ESRI), number PRS52.
    9. Stefanie Hoherz, 2014. "Maternity Leave in the Context of Couples: The Impact of Both Partners' Characteristics and Employment Experiences on Mothers' Re-entry into the Labour Market," SOEPpapers on Multidisciplinary Panel Data Research 647, DIW Berlin, The German Socio-Economic Panel (SOEP).
    10. Andrea Morescalchi, 2016. "A new career in a new town. Job search methods and regional mobility of unemployed workers," ERSA conference papers ersa16p307, European Regional Science Association.
    11. repec:zbw:rwirep:0484 is not listed on IDEAS
    12. Prieto-Rodríguez, Juan & Rodríguez-Gutiérrez, César, 2000. "Participation of Married Women in the Labour Market and the 'Added Worker Effect' in Europe," IRISS Working Paper Series 2000-12, IRISS at CEPS/INSTEAD.
    13. DUGUET Emmanuel & SIMONNET Veronique, 2004. "The participation of couples in the labor market: an econometric analysis," Labor and Demography 0411005, EconWPA.
    14. DeRiviere, Linda, 2008. "Have we come a long way? Using the Survey of Labour and Income Dynamics to revisit the 'pin money' theory," Journal of Behavioral and Experimental Economics (formerly The Journal of Socio-Economics), Elsevier, vol. 37(6), pages 2340-2367, December.
    15. Chalmers, J. & Kalb, G., 2000. "Are Casual Jobs a Freeway to Permanent Employment?," Monash Econometrics and Business Statistics Working Papers 8/00, Monash University, Department of Econometrics and Business Statistics.

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