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Why Is Trade Reform So Difficult in Africa?

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  • Rodrik, Dani

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  • Rodrik, Dani, 1998. "Why Is Trade Reform So Difficult in Africa?," Journal of African Economies, Centre for the Study of African Economies (CSAE), vol. 7(0), pages 43-69, June.
  • Handle: RePEc:oup:jafrec:v:7:y:1998:i:0:p:43-69
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Richard Mash, 1999. "The Investment Response to Imperfectly Credible Trade Liberalisation with Endogenous Probability of Reversal," Economics Series Working Papers WPS/1998-13, University of Oxford, Department of Economics.
    2. T. Ademola OYEJIDE, 2000. "Interests And Options Of Developing And Least-Developed Countries In A New Round Of Multilateral Trade Negotiations," G-24 Discussion Papers 2, United Nations Conference on Trade and Development.
    3. Cadot, Olivier & de Melo, Jaime & Olarreaga, Marcelo, 1999. "Asymmetric Regionalism in Sub-Saharan Africa: Where Do We Stand?," CEPR Discussion Papers 2299, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    4. Souleymane Soumahoro, 2014. "Export Taxes and Consumption: A ‘Natural Experiment’ from Côte d'Ivoire," HiCN Working Papers 182, Households in Conflict Network.
    5. Chantal Dupasquier & Patrick N. Osakwe, 2006. "Trade Regimes, Liberalization and Macroeconomic Instability in Africa," Development Economics Working Papers 21823, East Asian Bureau of Economic Research.
    6. Morten Jerven, 2014. "A West African experiment: constructing a GDP series for colonial Ghana, 1891–1950," Economic History Review, Economic History Society, vol. 67(4), pages 964-992, November.
    7. Robinson, Peter & Govereh, Jones & Ndlela, Daniel, 2007. "Distortions to Agricultural Incentives in Zambia," Agricultural Distortions Working Paper 48516, World Bank.
    8. Sonali Deraniyagala & Ben Fine, 2000. "New Trade Theory Versus Old Trade Policy: A Continuing Enigma," Working Papers 102, Department of Economics, SOAS, University of London, UK.
    9. Akiyama, Takamasa & Baffes, John & Larson, Donald F. & Varangis, Panos, 2003. "Commodity market reform in Africa: some recent experience," Economic Systems, Elsevier, vol. 27(1), pages 83-115, March.
    10. Matthew Lockwood, 2013. "What Can Climate-Adaptation Policy in Sub-Saharan Africa Learn from Research on Governance and Politics?," Development Policy Review, Overseas Development Institute, vol. 31(6), pages 647-676, November.
    11. Namasaka, Martin, 2015. "Trade as a Collective Action Problem," MPRA Paper 68146, University Library of Munich, Germany, revised 31 Dec 2015.
    12. Matthew Lockwood, 2005. "Will a Marshall Plan for Africa make poverty history?," Journal of International Development, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 17(6), pages 775-789.
    13. Tim Allen & Diana Weinhold, 2000. "Dropping the debt for the new millennium: is it such a good idea?," Journal of International Development, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 12(6), pages 857-875.

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