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The Oil Nouveau-Riche and Arms Imports

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  • Pierre-Louis Vézina

Abstract

Countries that strike it rich when exploring for oil and gas often fail to see growth materialise. This paper shows that one way things can go awry is via squandering new wealth, based on future resource revenues, on arms imports. Across developing countries, in the 5 years following a giant oil or gas discovery, arms imports increase by 30% on average. This effect only occurs in non-democracies with high levels of corruption, and there is suggestive evidence that it is driven in part by arms imports from China and Russia, and not by imports from other major arms exporters. These estimates can be interpreted causally as the timing of giant oil discoveries is unpredictable due to the uncertain nature of exploration.

Suggested Citation

  • Pierre-Louis Vézina, 2021. "The Oil Nouveau-Riche and Arms Imports," Journal of African Economies, Centre for the Study of African Economies (CSAE), vol. 30(4), pages 349-369.
  • Handle: RePEc:oup:jafrec:v:30:y:2021:i:4:p:349-369.
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    giant discoveries; arms trade; resource curse; JEL classification: F14; Q33;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • F14 - International Economics - - Trade - - - Empirical Studies of Trade
    • Q33 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Nonrenewable Resources and Conservation - - - Resource Booms (Dutch Disease)

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