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Has Economic Growth in Mozambique been Pro-Poor?


  • Channing Arndt
  • Robert C. James
  • Kenneth R. Simler


Using the 1996--7 and 2002--3 nationally representative household surveys, we examine the extent to which growth in Mozambique has been pro-poor. Although all segments of the income distribution experienced a rapid increase in consumption between the sample periods, the rate of growth in consumption was slightly higher for richer households. This has led to a moderate increase in inequality at the national level, as demonstrated by the rise in the Gini coefficient from 0.40 to 0.42. However, this slight increase in inequality at the national level is not statistically significant, and its impact on poverty reduction efforts is small: the poverty headcount would have been 53.0% in 2002--3 if all sections of society had enjoyed the mean growth rate in consumption, compared with the 54.1% at which it actually stood. Interestingly, static decompositions of the generalised entropy class of inequality measures indicate that inequality in real consumption between provinces and regions has diminished over time, in contrast to popular claims. Maputo City continues to have the highest rates of inequality in the country and witnessed a significant increase in inequality between 1996--7 and 2002--3 (the Gini coefficient rose from 0.44 to 0.52). Copyright 2006, Oxford University Press.

Suggested Citation

  • Channing Arndt & Robert C. James & Kenneth R. Simler, 2006. "Has Economic Growth in Mozambique been Pro-Poor?," Journal of African Economies, Centre for the Study of African Economies (CSAE), vol. 15(4), pages 571-602, December.
  • Handle: RePEc:oup:jafrec:v:15:y:2006:i:4:p:571-602

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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Dani Rodrik, 2013. "When Ideas Trump Interests : Preferences, World Views, and Policy  Innovations," Working Papers id:5558, eSocialSciences.
    2. Simler, Kenneth R., 2006. "Nutrition mapping in Tanzania: an exploratory analysis," FCND discussion papers 204, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
    3. World Bank, 2008. "Mozambique - Beating the Odds : Sustaining Inclusion in a Growing Economy - A Mozambique Poverty, Gender, and Social Assessment, Volume 1. Main Report," World Bank Other Operational Studies 7981, The World Bank.
    4. Burchi, Francesco, 2010. "Child nutrition in Mozambique in 2003: The role of mother's schooling and nutrition knowledge," Economics & Human Biology, Elsevier, vol. 8(3), pages 331-345, December.
    5. Arndt, Channing & Benfica, Rui & Tarp, Finn & Thurlow, James & Uaiene, Rafael, 2010. "Biofuels, poverty, and growth: a computable general equilibrium analysis of Mozambique," Environment and Development Economics, Cambridge University Press, vol. 15(01), pages 81-105, February.
    6. Benedito Cunguara & Joseph Hanlon, 2012. "Whose Wealth Is It Anyway? Mozambique's Outstanding Economic Growth with Worsening Rural Poverty," Development and Change, International Institute of Social Studies, vol. 43(3), pages 623-647, May.
    7. Channing Arndt & Sam Jones & Finn Tarp, 2006. "Aid and Development: The Mozambican Case," Discussion Papers 06-13, University of Copenhagen. Department of Economics.
    8. repec:jda:journl:vol.51:year:2017:issue1:pp:343-359 is not listed on IDEAS
    9. Arndt, Channing, 2005. "The Doha Trade Round and Mozambique," Policy Research Working Paper Series 3717, The World Bank.
    10. Sheilla Nyasha Author-Name: Yvonne Gwenhure & Nicholas M. Odhiambo, 2017. "Poverty and Economic Growth in Ethiopia: A Multivariate Causal Linkage," Journal of Developing Areas, Tennessee State University, College of Business, vol. 51(1), pages 343-359, January-M.

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