IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/a/oup/jafrec/v14y2005i3p435-482.html
   My bibliography  Save this article

The Utilisation of Curative Healthcare in Mozambique: Does Income Matter?

Author

Listed:
  • Magnus Lindelow

Abstract

In Mozambique, easily treatable diseases such as malaria, diarrhoea and respiratory infections contribute to a heavy burden of disease. Notwithstanding efforts by the Mozambican government to promote access to healthcare, many who could benefit from simple, cost-effective healthcare services do not currently receive treatment. Moreover, it is known that the utilisation of health services varies considerably across spatial domains and socio-economic groups. This paper is concerned with understanding the determinants of utilisation of curative health services, paying particular attention to the role of income. It provides a broad analytical framework for analysing both the binary decision to seek formal healthcare in the event of illness, and the multinomial choice of healthcare provider. The results show that income is a relatively unimportant determinant of healthcare choices in Mozambique. Instead, other factors, in particular education and physical access, are more important. Moreover, unlike in some studies, own (time) price elasticity does not vary notably with income. At a methodological level, the analysis shows that the general conclusions are robust to a number of estimation issues that are rarely addressed explicitly in the analysis of healthcare choices, including sample selection, the potential endogeneity of consumption and cluster-level unobservables. For the analysis of provider choice, the paper demonstrates the merits of a 'flexible' behavioural model. In particular, the paper rejects some of the restrictions of the standard model of provider choice, and shows that both the level of the price elasticity and the extent to which the elasticity varies with income is sensitive to the empirical specification. Copyright 2005, Oxford University Press.

Suggested Citation

  • Magnus Lindelow, 2005. "The Utilisation of Curative Healthcare in Mozambique: Does Income Matter?," Journal of African Economies, Centre for the Study of African Economies (CSAE), vol. 14(3), pages 435-482, September.
  • Handle: RePEc:oup:jafrec:v:14:y:2005:i:3:p:435-482
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    To our knowledge, this item is not available for download. To find whether it is available, there are three options:
    1. Check below whether another version of this item is available online.
    2. Check on the provider's web page whether it is in fact available.
    3. Perform a search for a similarly titled item that would be available.

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. Christelle Grobler & Ian c. Stuart, 2007. "Health Care Provider Choice," South African Journal of Economics, Economic Society of South Africa, vol. 75(2), pages 327-350, June.
    2. Sato, Azusa, 2012. "Do Inequalities in Health Care Utilization in Developing Countries Change When We Take into Account Traditional Medicines?," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 40(11), pages 2275-2289.
    3. Ronelle Burger & Christelle Swanepoel, 2006. "Have pro-poor health policies improved the targeting of spending and the effective delivery of health care in South Africa?," Working Papers 12/2006, Stellenbosch University, Department of Economics.
    4. Ronelle Burger, 2007. "Policy Brief: How pro-poor is the South African Health System?," Working Papers 06/2007, Stellenbosch University, Department of Economics.
    5. Jacky MATHONNAT & Yong HE & Martine AUDIBERT, 2013. "Two-Period Comparison of Healthcare Demand with Income Growth and Population Aging in Rural China: Implications for Adjustment of the Healthcare Supply and Development," Working Papers 201315, CERDI.
    6. Sato, Azusa, 2012. "Does socio-economic status explain use of modern and traditional health care services?," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 75(8), pages 1450-1459.

    More about this item

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:oup:jafrec:v:14:y:2005:i:3:p:435-482. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Oxford University Press) or (Christopher F. Baum). General contact details of provider: http://edirc.repec.org/data/csaoxuk.html .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    We have no references for this item. You can help adding them by using this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.