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Time-Series Evidence on the Nonlinearity Hypothesis for Public Spending

Author

Listed:
  • Stefan Mittnik
  • Thorsten Neumann

Abstract

Barro-type endogenous growth models propose a nonmonotonic relationship between productive public spending and growth. Under this so-called nonlinearity hypothesis the size and direction of growth effects due to an increase in public spending depend on the share of public spending in GDP. Employing German time-series data we examine the validity of the nonlinearity hypothesis. We estimate growth effects by using models whose coefficients are allowed to vary with the share of public spending in GDP. Our results support the hypothesis for public consumption but not for public investment data. (JEL H54, E62, C22) Copyright 2003, Oxford University Press.

Suggested Citation

  • Stefan Mittnik & Thorsten Neumann, 2003. "Time-Series Evidence on the Nonlinearity Hypothesis for Public Spending," Economic Inquiry, Western Economic Association International, vol. 41(4), pages 565-573, October.
  • Handle: RePEc:oup:ecinqu:v:41:y:2003:i:4:p:565-573
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    File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10.1093/ei/cbg028
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Tamoya Christie, 2014. "The Effect Of Government Spending On Economic Growth: Testing The Non-Linear Hypothesis," Bulletin of Economic Research, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 66(2), pages 183-204, April.
    2. Gebregziabher, Fiseha & Nino-Zarazua, Miguel, 2014. "Social spending and aggregate welfare in developing and transition economies," WIDER Working Paper Series 082, World Institute for Development Economic Research (UNU-WIDER).
    3. François Facchini & Mickael Melki, 2014. "Political Ideology And Economic Growth: Evidence From The French Democracy," Economic Inquiry, Western Economic Association International, vol. 52(4), pages 1408-1426, October.
    4. Thibaut Dort & Pierre-Guillaume Méon & Khalid Sekkat, 2014. "Does Investment Spur Growth Everywhere? Not Where Institutions Are Weak," Kyklos, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 67(4), pages 482-505, November.
    5. Giorgio d'Agostino & Luca Pieroni & J Paul Dunne, 2009. "Optimal Military Spending in the US: A Time Series Analysis," Working Papers 0903, Department of Accounting, Economics and Finance, Bristol Business School, University of the West of England, Bristol.
    6. d'Agostino, Giorgio & Daddi, Pierluigi & Pieroni, Luca & Steinbrueck, Eric, 2014. "Does military spending stimulate growth? An empirical investigation in Italy," MPRA Paper 58290, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    7. Rajkumar, Andrew Sunil & Swaroop, Vinaya, 2008. "Public spending and outcomes: Does governance matter?," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 86(1), pages 96-111, April.
    8. François Facchini & Mickael Melki, 2014. "Political Ideology And Economic Growth: Evidence From The French Democracy," Economic Inquiry, Western Economic Association International, vol. 52(4), pages 1408-1426, October.
    9. d'Agostino, G. & Dunne, J.P. & Pieroni, L., 2011. "Optimal military spending in the US: A time series analysis," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 28(3), pages 1068-1077, May.
    10. Facchini, François & Melki, Mickaël, 2013. "Efficient government size: France in the 20th century," European Journal of Political Economy, Elsevier, vol. 31(C), pages 1-14.
    11. d'Agostino, G. & Dunne, J.P. & Pieroni, L., 2016. "Corruption and growth in Africa," European Journal of Political Economy, Elsevier, vol. 43(C), pages 71-88.
    12. Milad Zarin-Nejadan, 2011. "Government and Growth," IRENE Working Papers 11-02, IRENE Institute of Economic Research.
    13. Ratbek Dzhumashev, 2014. "The Two-Way Relationship Between Government Spending And Corruption And Its Effects On Economic Growth," Contemporary Economic Policy, Western Economic Association International, vol. 32(2), pages 403-419, April.

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • H54 - Public Economics - - National Government Expenditures and Related Policies - - - Infrastructures
    • E62 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Macroeconomic Policy, Macroeconomic Aspects of Public Finance, and General Outlook - - - Fiscal Policy
    • C22 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Single Equation Models; Single Variables - - - Time-Series Models; Dynamic Quantile Regressions; Dynamic Treatment Effect Models; Diffusion Processes

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