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The Supply of Infants Relinquished for Adoption: Did Access to Abortion Make a Difference?

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  • Gennetian, Lisa A

Abstract

Motivated by a theory of desired fertility I use three years of aggregate state level data to examine the impact of abortion access on the supply of infants relinquished for adoption. I show evidence that abortion access affected the supply of infants relinquished during the 1980s in two different ways. First, the availability of abortion providers has the expected effect of reducing the supply of infants relinquished, particularly relative to the demand for abortion. Second, abortion law has an unexpected negative effect. This suggests that as abortion laws become more restrictive the total number of unwanted births may decrease. Copyright 1999 by Oxford University Press.

Suggested Citation

  • Gennetian, Lisa A, 1999. "The Supply of Infants Relinquished for Adoption: Did Access to Abortion Make a Difference?," Economic Inquiry, Western Economic Association International, vol. 37(3), pages 412-431, July.
  • Handle: RePEc:oup:ecinqu:v:37:y:1999:i:3:p:412-31
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    Cited by:

    1. Mary Eschelbach Hansen, 2005. "Using Subsidies to Promote the Adoption of Children from Foster Care," Working Papers 2005-15, American University, Department of Economics.
    2. Mary Hansen, 2007. "Using Subsidies to Promote the Adoption of Children from Foster Care," Journal of Family and Economic Issues, Springer, vol. 28(3), pages 377-393, September.
    3. Christopher Balding, 2010. "A Modest Proposal for a Two-Sided Market Clearing Institution under Asymmetric Supply Constraints with Skewed Pricing: The Market for Adoption and Abortion in the United States," Journal of Public Economic Theory, Association for Public Economic Theory, vol. 12(6), pages 1059-1080, December.
    4. repec:eee:quaeco:v:64:y:2017:i:c:p:22-31 is not listed on IDEAS
    5. Whitaker, Stephan, 2011. "The impact of legalized abortion on high school graduation through selection and composition," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 30(2), pages 228-246, April.

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