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New Evidence on the Retirement and Depreciation of Machine Tools

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  • Oliner, Stephen D

Abstract

This paper uses data from machinery dealers to estimate the retirement and depreciation patterns for a broad set of conventional machine tools. According to the dealers, the average service life of these machines at the survey date was about thirty years. Service lives were even longer in the mid-1970s, with the reduction over time likely caused by the diffusion of superior, computer-controlled machines. Consistent with the relatively long average life, the conventional machines have depreciated slowly. The author uses the results to asses the average service life assumed by the Bureau of Economic Analysis to construct capital stocks for metalworking machinery. Copyright 1996 by Oxford University Press.

Suggested Citation

  • Oliner, Stephen D, 1996. "New Evidence on the Retirement and Depreciation of Machine Tools," Economic Inquiry, Western Economic Association International, vol. 34(1), pages 57-77, January.
  • Handle: RePEc:oup:ecinqu:v:34:y:1996:i:1:p:57-77
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    Cited by:

    1. Michael J. Geske & Valerie A. Ramey & Matthew D. Shapiro, 2007. "Why Do Computers Depreciate?," NBER Chapters,in: Hard-to-Measure Goods and Services: Essays in Honor of Zvi Griliches, pages 121-150 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    2. Asplund, Marcus, 2000. "What Fraction of a Capital Investment Is Sunk Costs?," Journal of Industrial Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 48(3), pages 287-304, September.
    3. Nicholas Oulton, 2002. "ICT and Productivity Growth in the United Kingdom," Oxford Review of Economic Policy, Oxford University Press, vol. 18(3), pages 363-379.
    4. Albonico, Alice & Kalyvitis, Sarantis & Pappa, Evi, 2014. "Capital maintenance and depreciation over the business cycle," Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control, Elsevier, vol. 39(C), pages 273-286.
    5. Karl Storchmann, 2004. "On the Depreciation of Automobiles: An International Comparison," Transportation, Springer, vol. 31(4), pages 371-408, November.
    6. Mercado, P. Ruben & Cicowiez, Martin, 2013. "Growth analysis in developing countries: empirical issues and a small dynamic model," MPRA Paper 58017, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    7. Andrew Street & Padraic Ward, 2009. "NHS input and productivity growth 2003/4 - 2007/8," Working Papers 047cherp, Centre for Health Economics, University of York.
    8. Patrick Musso, 2006. "Capital Obsolescence, Growth Accounting and Total Factor Productivity," Revue de l'OFCE, Presses de Sciences-Po, vol. 97(5), pages 217-233.
    9. Ramey, Valerie A & SHAPIRO, MATTHEW D, 1998. "Displaced Capital," University of California at San Diego, Economics Working Paper Series qt49k7n14z, Department of Economics, UC San Diego.
    10. Hassler, John & Krusell, Per & Storesletten, Kjetil & Zilibotti, Fabrizio, 2008. "On the optimal timing of capital taxes," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 55(4), pages 692-709, May.
    11. Nicholas Oulton & Sylaja Srinivasan, 2003. "Capital stocks, capital services, and depreciation: an integrated framework," Bank of England working papers 192, Bank of England.

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