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Catholic High Schools and Rural Academic Achievement


  • William Sander


In this paper the effects of rural Catholic high schools on achievement in mathematics, high school graduation rates, and the likelihood that high school graduates go on to college are examined. Estimates that are corrected for selection bias indicate that rural Catholic high schools have a positive effect on mathematics test scores and no effect on graduation rates or on the odds of going on to college. Data from the High School and Beyond 1980 Sophomore Cohort Third Follow-Up (1986) are used. Copyright 1997, Oxford University Press.

Suggested Citation

  • William Sander, 1997. "Catholic High Schools and Rural Academic Achievement," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 79(1), pages 1-12.
  • Handle: RePEc:oup:ajagec:v:79:y:1997:i:1:p:1-12

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Drew Fudenberg & Jean Tirole, 1991. "Game Theory," MIT Press Books, The MIT Press, edition 1, volume 1, number 0262061414, January.
    2. Martin J. Osborne & Ariel Rubinstein, 1994. "A Course in Game Theory," MIT Press Books, The MIT Press, edition 1, volume 1, number 0262650401, July.
    3. William Hallagan, 1978. "Self-Selection by Contractual Choice and the Theory of Sharecropping," Bell Journal of Economics, The RAND Corporation, vol. 9(2), pages 344-354, Autumn.
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    Cited by:

    1. Danny Cohen-Zada & Todd Elder, 2012. "Religious Pluralism, Religious Market Shares and the Demand for Religious Schooling," Working Papers 1201, Ben-Gurion University of the Negev, Department of Economics.
    2. Marvin E. Dodson & Thomas A. Garrett, 2004. "Inefficient Education Spending in Public School Districts: A Case for Consolidation?," Contemporary Economic Policy, Western Economic Association International, vol. 22(2), pages 270-280, April.
    3. Cohen-Zada, Danny & Justman, Moshe, 2005. "The religious factor in private education," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 57(3), pages 391-418, May.
    4. Cohen-Zada, Danny, 2006. "Preserving religious identity through education: Economic analysis and evidence from the US," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 60(3), pages 372-398, November.
    5. Jacques, Charles & Brorsen, B. Wade & Richter, Francisca G. C., 2000. "Consolidating Rural School Districts: Potential Savings and Effects on Student Achievement," Journal of Agricultural and Applied Economics, Cambridge University Press, vol. 32(03), pages 573-583, December.
    6. Cohen-Zada, Danny & Justman, Moshe, 2003. "The political economy of school choice: linking theory and evidence," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 54(2), pages 277-308, September.
    7. Lonnie Stevans & David Sessions, 2000. "Private/Public School Choice and Student Performance Revisited," Education Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 8(2), pages 169-184.

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