IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/a/ntj/journl/v57y2004i3p739-56.html
   My bibliography  Save this article

Lost in Translation: Detecting Tax Shelter Activity in Financial Statements

Author

Listed:
  • McGill, Gary A.
  • Outslay, Edmund

Abstract

Whether financial statements of public U.S. corporations provide sufficient information to the public to determine a corporation's tax payment to the U.S. Treasury and its involvement in "tax shelter" transactions has been much debated since the well publicized collapses of Enron Corporation and WorldCom, Inc. In this paper, we use specific examples to demonstrate how "income tax note" data can be analyzed to answer these two questions and, in so doing, point out the limitations of using financial accounting information to address tax–related issues. We conclude with suggestions to increase the transparency of a corporation's tax activities through enhanced disclosure.

Suggested Citation

  • McGill, Gary A. & Outslay, Edmund, 2004. "Lost in Translation: Detecting Tax Shelter Activity in Financial Statements," National Tax Journal, National Tax Association;National Tax Journal, vol. 57(3), pages 739-756, September.
  • Handle: RePEc:ntj:journl:v:57:y:2004:i:3:p:739-56
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: https://www.ntanet.org/NTJ/57/3/ntj-v57n03p739-56-lost-translation-detecting-tax.pdf
    Download Restriction: Access to most recent volumes (current and past two years) is restricted to subscribers and members of the National Tax Association.

    File URL: https://www.ntanet.org/NTJ/57/3/ntj-v57n03p739-56-lost-translation-detecting-tax.html
    Download Restriction: Access to most recent volumes (current and past two years) is restricted to subscribers and members of the National Tax Association.

    As the access to this document is restricted, you may want to search for a different version of it.

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. Evers, Maria Theresia & Finke, Katharina & Matenaer, Sebastian & Meier, Ina & Zinn, Benedikt, 2014. "Evidence on book-tax differences and disclosure quality based on the notes to the financial statements," ZEW Discussion Papers 14-047, ZEW - Zentrum für Europäische Wirtschaftsforschung / Center for European Economic Research.
    2. Graham, John R. & Tucker, Alan L., 2006. "Tax shelters and corporate debt policy," Journal of Financial Economics, Elsevier, vol. 81(3), pages 563-594, September.
    3. Hanlon, Michelle & Heitzman, Shane, 2010. "A review of tax research," Journal of Accounting and Economics, Elsevier, vol. 50(2-3), pages 127-178, December.
    4. Gebhardt Heinz & Siemers Lars-H. R., 2017. "Die relative Steuerbelastung mittelständischer Kapitalgesellschaften: Evidenz von handelsbilanziellen Mikrodaten," Zeitschrift für Wirtschaftspolitik, De Gruyter, vol. 66(1), pages 1-35, April.
    5. Hanlon, Michelle & Laplante, Stacie Kelley & Shevlin, Terry, 2005. "Evidence for the Possible Information Loss of Conforming Book Income and Taxable Income," Journal of Law and Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 48(2), pages 407-442, October.
    6. Tang, Tanya & Firth, Michael, 2011. "Can book-tax differences capture earnings management and tax Management? Empirical evidence from China," The International Journal of Accounting, Elsevier, vol. 46(2), pages 175-204, June.
    7. Evers, Maria Theresia, 2015. "Evidence on Book-tax Differences and Disclosure Quality Based on the Notes to the Financial Statements," Annual Conference 2015 (Muenster): Economic Development - Theory and Policy 113127, Verein für Socialpolitik / German Economic Association.
    8. Michelle Hanlon & Terry Shevlin, 2005. "Book-Tax Conformity for Corporate Income: An Introduction to the Issues," NBER Chapters,in: Tax Policy and the Economy, Volume 19, pages 101-134 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    9. Michelle Hanlon & Terry Shevlin, 2005. "Bank-Tax Conformity for Corporate Income: An Introduction to the Issues," NBER Working Papers 11067, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    10. Armstrong, Christopher S. & Blouin, Jennifer L. & Larcker, David F., 2012. "The incentives for tax planning," Journal of Accounting and Economics, Elsevier, vol. 53(1), pages 391-411.
    11. George A. Plesko, 2007. "Estimates of the Magnitude of Financial and Tax Reporting Conflicts," NBER Working Papers 13295, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    12. Cen, Ling & Maydew, Edward L. & Zhang, Liandong & Zuo, Luo, 2017. "Customer–supplier relationships and corporate tax avoidance," Journal of Financial Economics, Elsevier, vol. 123(2), pages 377-394.

    More about this item

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:ntj:journl:v:57:y:2004:i:3:p:739-56. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Sally Sztrecska). General contact details of provider: https://www.ntanet.org/ .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    We have no references for this item. You can help adding them by using this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.