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Valuation Ratios and Stock Return Predictability in South Africa: Is It There?

Listed author(s):
  • Rangan Gupta
  • Mampho P. Modise

Using monthly South African data for January 1990 through October 2009, this paper, to the best of our knowledge, is the first to examine the predictability of real stock return based on valuation ratios, namely, price-dividend and price-earnings ratios. We cannot detect either short-horizon or long-horizon predictability; that is, the hypothesis that the current value of a valuation ratio is uncorrelated with future stock price changes cannot be rejected at both short and long horizons based on bootstrapped critical values constructed from linear representations of the data. We find, via Monte Carlo simulations, that the power to detect predictability in finite samples tends to decrease at long horizons in a linear framework. Although Monte Carlo simulations applied to exponential smooth-transition autoregressive models of the price-dividend and price-earnings ratios show increased power, the ability of the nonlinear framework in explaining the pattern of stock return predictability in the data does not show any promise at either short or long horizons, just as in the linear predictive regressions.

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Article provided by M.E. Sharpe, Inc. in its journal Emerging Markets Finance and Trade.

Volume (Year): 48 (2012)
Issue (Month): 1 (January)
Pages: 70-82

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Handle: RePEc:mes:emfitr:v:48:y:2012:i:1:p:70-82
Contact details of provider: Web page: http://mesharpe.metapress.com/link.asp?target=journal&id=111024

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