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Asymmetric Monetary Effects on Interest Rates across Monetary Policy Stances

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  • Choi, Woon Gyu

Abstract

This paper provides new evidence that the interest rates response to a money supply shock varies across the state of the monetary policy stance. The state is assigned to one of the tight, neutral, and loose regimes based on an estimated policy stance index. The results of threshold vector autoregression analysis imply that pure liquidity and expected inflation effects vary across regimes with agents' reactions to policy. The results exhibit a persistent, dominating liquidity effect under the neutral and loose regimes but a reversed liquidity effect after a short lag under the tight regime.

Suggested Citation

  • Choi, Woon Gyu, 1999. "Asymmetric Monetary Effects on Interest Rates across Monetary Policy Stances," Journal of Money, Credit and Banking, Blackwell Publishing, vol. 31(3), pages 386-416, August.
  • Handle: RePEc:mcb:jmoncb:v:31:y:1999:i:3:p:386-416
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Davide Furceri, 2004. "Does the EMU Need a Fiscal Transfer Mechanism?," Vierteljahrshefte zur Wirtschaftsforschung / Quarterly Journal of Economic Research, DIW Berlin, German Institute for Economic Research, vol. 73(3), pages 418-428.
    2. George Athanasopoulos & Heather M. Anderson & Farshid Vahid, 2007. "Nonlinear autoregressive leading indicator models of output in G-7 countries," Journal of Applied Econometrics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 22(1), pages 63-87.
    3. Michael S. Hanson & Erik Hurst & Ki Young Park, 2006. "Does Monetary Policy Help Least Those Who Need It Most?," Wesleyan Economics Working Papers 2006-006, Wesleyan University, Department of Economics.
    4. Fabio ALESSANDRINI, 2003. "Some Additional Evidence from the Credit Channel on the Response to Monetary Shocks: Looking for Asymmetries," Cahiers de Recherches Economiques du Département d'Econométrie et d'Economie politique (DEEP) 03.04, Université de Lausanne, Faculté des HEC, DEEP.
    5. Nikolaus A. Siegfried, 2002. "An information-theoretic extension to structural VAR modelling," Econometrics 0203005, EconWPA.
    6. Jan Jacobs & Jan Kakes, 2000. "Credit demand asymmetry in the Netherlands 1983-1997," MEB Series (discontinued) 2000-11, Netherlands Central Bank, Monetary and Economic Policy Department.
    7. Shin-Ichi Nishiyama, 2011. "The Cross-Euler Equation Approach to testing for the Liquidity Constraint: Evidence from Macro and Micro Data," TERG Discussion Papers 273, Graduate School of Economics and Management, Tohoku University.
    8. Sensier, Marianne & Osborn, Denise R & Ocal, Nadir, 2002. " Asymmetric Interest Rate Effects for the UK Real Economy," Oxford Bulletin of Economics and Statistics, Department of Economics, University of Oxford, vol. 64(4), pages 315-339, September.
    9. Tkacz, Greg, 2001. "Endogenous thresholds and tests for asymmetry in US prime rate movements," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 73(2), pages 207-211, November.
    10. Nesmith Travis D & Jones Barry E, 2008. "Linear Cointegration of Nonlinear Time Series with an Application to Interest Rate Dynamics," Studies in Nonlinear Dynamics & Econometrics, De Gruyter, vol. 12(1), pages 1-18, March.
    11. Davide Furceri, 2002. "Risk-sharing e architettura istituzionale delle politiche di stabilizzazione nell'UME: aspetti metodologici e verifica empirica," Rivista di Politica Economica, SIPI Spa, vol. 92(6), pages 175-210, November-.

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