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Market versus Corporate Structure in Plant-Level Innovation Performance

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  • Love, James H
  • Ashcroft, Brian

Abstract

This paper examines the effect which market and corporate structure have on the extent of innovation for a sample of circa 300 manufacturing plants located in Scotland. Innovation is defined as the introduction of a commercially significant new product at the establishment level. The theoretical model of Geroski (1990) is extended to incorporate plant-level variables such as size, multiplant operation, the presence of R&D facilities and external/indigenous ownership. A distinction is made between the direct and indirect effects of these variables. Negative binomial estimations indicate that corporate structure influences are more important in determining the number of innovations than market structure and barrier to entry variables. Plant size, foreign ownership and the presence of R&D are all positively associated with innovation. Direct effects greatly outweigh indirect effects. Tobit estimations on the number of innovations per employee support the findings of Acs and Audretsch (1988) that smaller enterprises are more innovation intensive than larger enterprises, at least up to a limit of around 1,200 employees. The positive effect of R&D arises principally from increasing the probability of a plant becoming an innovator, rather than from making a plant more innovation intensive. By contrast, the importance of size lies principally in encouraging further innovations among plants which are already innovators, but less than proportionately with the increase in employment size. Copyright 1999 by Kluwer Academic Publishers

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  • Love, James H & Ashcroft, Brian, 1999. "Market versus Corporate Structure in Plant-Level Innovation Performance," Small Business Economics, Springer, vol. 13(2), pages 97-109, September.
  • Handle: RePEc:kap:sbusec:v:13:y:1999:i:2:p:97-109
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    Cited by:

    1. C. Praag & Peter Versloot, 2007. "What is the value of entrepreneurship? A review of recent research," Small Business Economics, Springer, vol. 29(4), pages 351-382, December.
    2. Andrea Vaona & Mario Pianta, 2008. "Firm Size and Innovation in European Manufacturing," Small Business Economics, Springer, vol. 30(3), pages 283-299, March.
    3. Love, James H. & Roper, Stephen & Du, Jun, 2009. "Innovation, ownership and profitability," International Journal of Industrial Organization, Elsevier, vol. 27(3), pages 424-434, May.
    4. Dolfsma, W.A. & van der Panne, G., 2006. "Currents and Sub-currents in the River of Innovations - Explaining Innovativeness using New-Product Announcements," ERIM Report Series Research in Management ERS-2006-036-ORG, Erasmus Research Institute of Management (ERIM), ERIM is the joint research institute of the Rotterdam School of Management, Erasmus University and the Erasmus School of Economics (ESE) at Erasmus University Rotterdam.
    5. Doh, Soogwan & Kim, Byungkyu, 2014. "Government support for SME innovations in the regional industries: The case of government financial support program in South Korea," Research Policy, Elsevier, vol. 43(9), pages 1557-1569.
    6. Azar, Goudarz & Ciabuschi, Francesco, 2017. "Organizational innovation, technological innovation, and export performance: The effects of innovation radicalness and extensiveness," International Business Review, Elsevier, vol. 26(2), pages 324-336.
    7. Dolfsma, Wilfred & van der Panne, Gerben, 2008. "Currents and sub-currents in innovation flows: Explaining innovativeness using new-product announcements," Research Policy, Elsevier, vol. 37(10), pages 1706-1716, December.
    8. Love, James H. & Roper, Stephen, 2001. "Location and network effects on innovation success: evidence for UK, German and Irish manufacturing plants," Research Policy, Elsevier, vol. 30(4), pages 643-661, April.
    9. Love, James H. & Roper, Stephen, 2000. "Location And Network Effects On Innovation Success: Evidence For Uk, German And Irish Manufacturing Firms," ERSA conference papers ersa00p67, European Regional Science Association.
    10. Llanto, Gilberto M. & del Prado, Fatima, 2015. "Does Innovation Mediate Good Firm Performance?," Discussion Papers DP 2015-06, Philippine Institute for Development Studies.
    11. Huang C. & Wu Y. & Mohnen P. & Zhao Y., 2013. "Government support, innovation and productivity in the Haidian (Beijing) District," MERIT Working Papers 058, United Nations University - Maastricht Economic and Social Research Institute on Innovation and Technology (MERIT).

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