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A multiple indicator, multiple cause method for representing social capital with an application to psychological distress


  • Peter Congdon



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Suggested Citation

  • Peter Congdon, 2010. "A multiple indicator, multiple cause method for representing social capital with an application to psychological distress," Journal of Geographical Systems, Springer, vol. 12(1), pages 1-23, March.
  • Handle: RePEc:kap:jgeosy:v:12:y:2010:i:1:p:1-23
    DOI: 10.1007/s10109-009-0097-5

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Wu, De-Min, 1973. "Alternative Tests of Independence Between Stochastic Regressors and Disturbances," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 41(4), pages 733-750, July.
    2. Luc Anselin & Nancy Lozano-Gracia, 2008. "Errors in variables and spatial effects in hedonic house price models of ambient air quality," Empirical Economics, Springer, vol. 34(1), pages 5-34, February.
    3. Kelejian, Harry H. & Prucha, Ingmar R., 2010. "Specification and estimation of spatial autoregressive models with autoregressive and heteroskedastic disturbances," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 157(1), pages 53-67, July.
    4. Brasington, David M. & Hite, Diane, 2005. "Demand for environmental quality: a spatial hedonic analysis," Regional Science and Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 35(1), pages 57-82, January.
    5. Hausman, Jerry, 2015. "Specification tests in econometrics," Applied Econometrics, Publishing House "SINERGIA PRESS", vol. 38(2), pages 112-134.
    6. Can, Ayse, 1992. "Specification and estimation of hedonic housing price models," Regional Science and Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 22(3), pages 453-474, September.
    7. Kenneth Y. Chay & Michael Greenstone, 2005. "Does Air Quality Matter? Evidence from the Housing Market," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 113(2), pages 376-424, April.
    8. Spencer Banzhaf, H., 2005. "Green price indices," Journal of Environmental Economics and Management, Elsevier, vol. 49(2), pages 262-280, March.
    9. Boris A. Portnov, 2010. "Objective Vs. Perceived Air-Pollution As A Factor Of Housing Pricing: A Case Study Of The Greater Haifa Metropolitan Area," ERES eres2010_021, European Real Estate Society (ERES).
    10. R. Kelley Pace & James P. LeSage, 2004. "Spatial Statistics and Real Estate," The Journal of Real Estate Finance and Economics, Springer, vol. 29(2), pages 147-148, September.
    11. José-María Montero & Coro Chasco & Beatriz Larraz, 2010. "Building an environmental quality index for a big city: a spatial interpolation approach combined with a distance indicator," Journal of Geographical Systems, Springer, vol. 12(4), pages 435-459, December.
    12. Liv Osland, 2010. "An Application of Spatial Econometrics in Relation to Hedonic House Price Modelling," Journal of Real Estate Research, American Real Estate Society, vol. 32(3), pages 289-320.
    13. Won Kim, Chong & Phipps, Tim T. & Anselin, Luc, 2003. "Measuring the benefits of air quality improvement: a spatial hedonic approach," Journal of Environmental Economics and Management, Elsevier, vol. 45(1), pages 24-39, January.
    14. Smith, V Kerry & Huang, Ju-Chin, 1995. "Can Markets Value Air Quality? A Meta-analysis of Hedonic Property Value Models," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 103(1), pages 209-227, February.
    15. Harry Kelejian, 2008. "A spatial J-test for model specification against a single or a set of non-nested alternatives," Letters in Spatial and Resource Sciences, Springer, vol. 1(1), pages 3-11, April.
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    More about this item


    Social capital; Structural equation; Psychological distress; Area deprivation; Bayesian; C11; C30; I10;

    JEL classification:

    • C11 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Econometric and Statistical Methods and Methodology: General - - - Bayesian Analysis: General
    • C30 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Multiple or Simultaneous Equation Models; Multiple Variables - - - General
    • I10 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Health - - - General


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