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Pathways from Financial Knowledge to Relationship Satisfaction: The Roles of Financial Behaviors, Perceived Shared Financial Values with the Romantic Partner, and Debt

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Listed:
  • Casey J. Totenhagen

    () (The University of Alabama)

  • Melissa J. Wilmarth

    () (The University of Alabama)

  • Joyce Serido

    () (University of Minnesota)

  • Melissa A. Curran

    () (University of Arizona)

  • Soyeon Shim

    () (University of Wisconsin-Madison)

Abstract

We examined how subjective and objective financial knowledge were associated with relationship satisfaction through pathways of finance-related rewards (positive financial behaviors, perceived shared financial values with the romantic partner, or lower debt) in a sample of cohabiting or married young adults (N = 162). We used Waves 2, 3, and 4 of the Arizona Pathways to Life Success for University Students (APLUS) study to conduct path analyses. No pathways were significant in longitudinal models. In the cross-sectional models (Wave 4), we found individuals’ own subjective (but not objective) financial knowledge was associated with relationship satisfaction. This association was indirect in the model with perceived shared financial values, demonstrating that shared financial values with the romantic partner may be a key mechanism linking financial knowledge to improved relationship quality.

Suggested Citation

  • Casey J. Totenhagen & Melissa J. Wilmarth & Joyce Serido & Melissa A. Curran & Soyeon Shim, 2019. "Pathways from Financial Knowledge to Relationship Satisfaction: The Roles of Financial Behaviors, Perceived Shared Financial Values with the Romantic Partner, and Debt," Journal of Family and Economic Issues, Springer, vol. 40(3), pages 423-437, September.
  • Handle: RePEc:kap:jfamec:v:40:y:2019:i:3:d:10.1007_s10834-019-09611-9
    DOI: 10.1007/s10834-019-09611-9
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Fenaba R. Addo & Xing Zhang, 2020. "Debt Concordance and Relationship Quality: A Couple-Level Analysis," Journal of Family and Economic Issues, Springer, vol. 41(3), pages 405-423, September.
    2. Abdullah Al-Bahrani & Whitney Buser & Darshak Patel, 2020. "Early Causes of Financial Disquiet and the Gender Gap in Financial Literacy: Evidence from College Students in the Southeastern United States," Journal of Family and Economic Issues, Springer, vol. 41(3), pages 558-571, September.
    3. Xiaomin Li & Melissa A. Curran & Ashley B. LeBaron & Joyce Serido & Soyeon Shim, 2020. "Romantic Attachment Orientations, Financial Behaviors, and Life Outcomes Among Young Adults: A Mediating Analysis of a College Cohort," Journal of Family and Economic Issues, Springer, vol. 41(4), pages 658-671, December.

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