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Relations Between Economic Well-Being, Family Support, Community Attachment, and Life Satisfaction Among LGBQ Adults

Author

Listed:
  • Vanja Lazarevic

    () (Boston Children’s Hospital/Harvard Medical School)

  • Elizabeth G. Holman

    (University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign)

  • Ramona Faith Oswald

    (University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign)

  • Karen Z. Kramer

    (University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign)

Abstract

Abstract While studies with the general population indicate that one’s life satisfaction is related to economic well-being and social support, much less is known about these constructs among lesbian, gay, bisexual, and queer (LGBQ) populations. The current study examines the relationship between economic well-being and life satisfaction in a sample of 458 LGBQ individuals. Further, the direct and moderating effects of family and community support are examined. As hypothesized, perceived financial stress and proximal family support each had a significant main effect on life satisfaction. Household income (adjusted by number of individuals living in the household) had a non-linear effect on life satisfaction. Community support for LGBQ individuals was not associated with life satisfaction, and the moderating hypotheses were not supported. The findings and the implications for future research are discussed.

Suggested Citation

  • Vanja Lazarevic & Elizabeth G. Holman & Ramona Faith Oswald & Karen Z. Kramer, 2016. "Relations Between Economic Well-Being, Family Support, Community Attachment, and Life Satisfaction Among LGBQ Adults," Journal of Family and Economic Issues, Springer, vol. 37(4), pages 594-606, December.
  • Handle: RePEc:kap:jfamec:v:37:y:2016:i:4:d:10.1007_s10834-015-9464-1
    DOI: 10.1007/s10834-015-9464-1
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    References listed on IDEAS

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