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Fertility Intentions, Career Considerations and Subsequent Births: The Moderating Effects of Women’s Work Hours

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  • Karina Shreffler

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  • David Johnson

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Abstract

Prior research indicates a negative relationship between women’s labor force participation and fertility at the individual level in the United States, but little is known about the reasons for this relationship beyond work hours. We employed discrete event history models using panel data from the National Survey of Families and Households (N = 2,411) and found that the importance of career considerations mediates the work hours/fertility relationship. Further, fertility intentions and the importance of career considerations were more predictive of birth outcomes as women’s work hours increase. Ultimately, our findings challenge the assumption that working more hours is the direct cause for employed women having fewer children and highlight the importance of career and fertility preferences in fertility outcomes. Copyright Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2013

Suggested Citation

  • Karina Shreffler & David Johnson, 2013. "Fertility Intentions, Career Considerations and Subsequent Births: The Moderating Effects of Women’s Work Hours," Journal of Family and Economic Issues, Springer, vol. 34(3), pages 285-295, September.
  • Handle: RePEc:kap:jfamec:v:34:y:2013:i:3:p:285-295
    DOI: 10.1007/s10834-012-9331-2
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Karina Shreffler & Amy Pirretti & Robert Drago, 2010. "Work–Family Conflict and Fertility Intentions: Does Gender Matter?," Journal of Family and Economic Issues, Springer, vol. 31(2), pages 228-240, June.
    2. Enilda Delgado & Maria Canabal, 2006. "Factors Associated with Negative Spillover from Job to Home Among Latinos in the United States," Journal of Family and Economic Issues, Springer, vol. 27(1), pages 92-112, April.
    3. Benjamin Cheng, 1996. "The causal relationship between African American fertility and female labor supply: Policy implications," The Review of Black Political Economy, Springer;National Economic Association, vol. 25(2), pages 77-88, December.
    4. Agnese Vitali & Francesco C. Billari & Alexia Prskawetz & Maria Rita Testa, 2007. "Preference theory and low fertility: A comparative perspective," Working Papers 001, "Carlo F. Dondena" Centre for Research on Social Dynamics (DONDENA), Università Commerciale Luigi Bocconi.
    5. Catherine Hakim, 2003. "A New Approach to Explaining Fertility Patterns: Preference Theory," Population and Development Review, The Population Council, Inc., vol. 29(3), pages 349-374, September.
    6. O. Collver, 1968. "Women's work participation and fertility in metropolitan areas," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 5(1), pages 55-60, March.
    7. Wendy Campione, 2008. "Employed Women’s Well-Being: The Global and Daily Impact of Work," Journal of Family and Economic Issues, Springer, vol. 29(3), pages 346-361, September.
    8. Michael Hout, 1978. "The determinants of marital fertility in the united states, 1968–1970: Inferences from a dynamic model," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 15(2), pages 139-159, May.
    9. Anna Matysiak & Daniele Vignoli, 2006. "Fertility and women’s employment: a meta-analysis," MPIDR Working Papers WP-2006-048, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany.
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Daphne Pedersen & Gabe Kilzer, 2014. "Work-to-Family Conflict and the Maternal Gatekeeping of Dual-Earner Mothers with Young Children," Journal of Family and Economic Issues, Springer, vol. 35(2), pages 251-262, June.
    2. María Davia & Nuria Legazpe, 2014. "Determinants of Employment Decisions After the First Child Birth in Spain," Journal of Family and Economic Issues, Springer, vol. 35(2), pages 214-227, June.
    3. I-Chun Chen, 2016. "Parental Education and Fertility: An Empirical Investigation Based on Evidence from Taiwan," Journal of Family and Economic Issues, Springer, vol. 37(2), pages 272-284, June.
    4. Joelle Abramowitz, 2017. "Assisted Reproductive Technology and Women’s Timing of Marriage and Childbearing," Journal of Family and Economic Issues, Springer, vol. 38(1), pages 100-117, March.
    5. Tsung Huang & Tsun-Feng Chiang & Jiun-Nan Pan, 2015. "Fertility and Crime: Evidence from Spatial Analysis of Taiwan," Journal of Family and Economic Issues, Springer, vol. 36(3), pages 319-327, September.
    6. repec:kap:jfamec:v:39:y:2018:i:1:d:10.1007_s10834-017-9548-1 is not listed on IDEAS
    7. Silvia Mendolia, 2016. "Maternal Working Hours and the Well-Being of Adolescent Children: Evidence from British Data," Journal of Family and Economic Issues, Springer, vol. 37(4), pages 566-580, December.

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