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Progress in Model-To-Model Analysis

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  • Juliette Rouchier & Claudio Cioffi-Revilla & J. Gary Polhill & Keiki Takadama, 2008. "Progress in Model-To-Model Analysis," Journal of Artificial Societies and Social Simulation, Journal of Artificial Societies and Social Simulation, vol. 11(2), pages 1-8.
  • Handle: RePEc:jas:jasssj:2007-69-1
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    File URL: http://jasss.soc.surrey.ac.uk/11/2/8/8.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Stefano Bartolini, 1993. "On Time and Comparative Research," Journal of Theoretical Politics, , vol. 5(2), pages 131-167, April.
    2. Juliette Rouchier, 2003. "Re-implementation of a multi-agent model aimed at sustaining experimental economic research: The case of simulations with emerging speculation," Post-Print halshs-00550494, HAL.
    3. David Hales & Juliette Rouchier & Bruce Edmonds, 2003. "Model-To-Model Analysis," Journal of Artificial Societies and Social Simulation, Journal of Artificial Societies and Social Simulation, vol. 6(4), pages 1-5.
    4. Juliette Rouchier, 2003. "Re-Implementation of a Multi-Agent Model Aimed at Sustaining Experimental Economic Research: the Case of Simulations with Emerging Speculation," Journal of Artificial Societies and Social Simulation, Journal of Artificial Societies and Social Simulation, vol. 6(4), pages 1-7.
    5. Giovanni Sartori, 1991. "Comparing and Miscomparing," Journal of Theoretical Politics, , vol. 3(3), pages 243-257, July.
    6. Robert Axtell & Robert Axelrod & Joshua M. Epstein & Michael D. Cohen, 1995. "Aligning Simulation Models: A Case Study and Results," Working Papers 95-07-065, Santa Fe Institute.
    7. Bruce Edmonds & David Hales, 2003. "Replication, Replication and Replication: Some Hard Lessons from Model Alignmen," Journal of Artificial Societies and Social Simulation, Journal of Artificial Societies and Social Simulation, vol. 6(4), pages 1-11.
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    Cited by:

    1. Claudio Cioffi-Revilla, 2010. "A Methodology for Complex Social Simulations," Journal of Artificial Societies and Social Simulation, Journal of Artificial Societies and Social Simulation, vol. 13(1), pages 1-7.
    2. James D. A. Millington & John Wainwright, 2016. "Comparative Approaches for Innovation in Agent-Based Modelling of Landscape Change," Land, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 5(2), pages 1-4, May.
    3. Sylvie Geisendorf, 2016. "The impact of personal beliefs on climate change: the “battle of perspectives” revisited," Journal of Evolutionary Economics, Springer, vol. 26(3), pages 551-580, July.
    4. J. Gary Polhill, 2010. "ODD Updated," Journal of Artificial Societies and Social Simulation, Journal of Artificial Societies and Social Simulation, vol. 13(4), pages 1-9.
    5. Wolfgang Radax & Bernhard Rengs, 2010. "Prospects and Pitfalls of Statistical Testing: Insights from Replicating the Demographic Prisoner's Dilemma," Journal of Artificial Societies and Social Simulation, Journal of Artificial Societies and Social Simulation, vol. 13(4), pages 1-1.
    6. repec:gam:jlands:v:5:y:2016:i:2:p:13:d:70411 is not listed on IDEAS

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