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Case Study: A gender-focused macro-micro analysis of the poverty impacts of trade liberalization in South Africa

Author

Listed:
  • Margaret Chitiga

    () (University of Pretoria, Pretoria 0081, South Africa)

  • John Cockburn

    () (Université Laval, Pavillon J-A DeSève, Quebec, Canada, G1V 0A6;)

  • Bernard Decaluwé

    () (Université Laval, Pavillon J-A DeSève, Quebec, Canada, G1V 0A6;)

  • Ismaël Fofana

    () (Université Laval, Pavillon J-A DeSève, Quebec, Canada, G1V 0A6)

  • Ramos Mabugu

    () (Research and Policy Director, Financial and Fiscal Commission, 2nd Floor Montrose Place, Midrand 1685, South Africa)

Abstract

This case study examines the impacts on poverty and equality of the extended trade liberalisation strategy that South Africa has been following since 1994. The paper features an integrated CGE microsimulation model with explicit incorporation of non-market activities and gender decomposition. This makes it possible to assess the effects of trade liberalization on between and within-group poverty, as well as on gender-disaggregated household production and leisure. The findings reveal that trade liberalization is strongly gender biased against women.

Suggested Citation

  • Margaret Chitiga & John Cockburn & Bernard Decaluwé & Ismaël Fofana & Ramos Mabugu, 2010. "Case Study: A gender-focused macro-micro analysis of the poverty impacts of trade liberalization in South Africa," International Journal of Microsimulation, International Microsimulation Association, vol. 3(1), pages 104-108.
  • Handle: RePEc:ijm:journl:v:3:y:2010:i:1:p:104-108
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    File URL: http://ima.natsem.canberra.edu.au/IJM/V3_1/IJM_31.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Lixin Cai & John Creedy & Guyonne Kalb, 2006. "Accounting For Population Ageing In Tax Microsimulation Modelling By Survey Reweighting ," Australian Economic Papers, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 45(1), pages 18-37, March.
    2. repec:eme:ceapzz:s0573-855520140000293008 is not listed on IDEAS
    3. François Bourguignon & Maurizio Bussolo & Luiz A. Pereira da Silva, 2008. "The Impact of Macroeconomic Policies on Poverty and Income Distribution : Macro-Micro Evaluation Techniques and Tools," World Bank Publications, The World Bank, number 6586.
    4. Milanovic, Branko & Yitzhaki, Shlomo, 2002. "Decomposing World Income Distribution: Does the World Have a Middle Class?," Review of Income and Wealth, International Association for Research in Income and Wealth, vol. 48(2), pages 155-178, June.
    5. John Cockburn & Luc Savard & Luca Tiberti, 2014. "Macro-Micro Models," Contributions to Economic Analysis,in: Handbook of Microsimulation Modelling, volume 127, pages 275-304 Emerald Publishing Ltd.
    6. Anne-Sophie Robilliard & Sherman Robinson, 2003. "Reconciling Household Surveys and National Accounts Data Using a Cross Entropy Estimation Method," Review of Income and Wealth, International Association for Research in Income and Wealth, vol. 49(3), pages 395-406, September.
    7. Fran??ois Bourguignon & Francisco H. G. Ferreira & Phillippe G. Leite, 2002. "Beyond Oaxaca-Blinder: Accounting for Differences in Household Income Distributions Across Countries," William Davidson Institute Working Papers Series 478, William Davidson Institute at the University of Michigan.
    8. Kym Anderson & John Cockburn & Will Martin, 2010. "Agricultural Price Distortions, Inequality, and Poverty," World Bank Publications, The World Bank, number 2430.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Stefan Boeters & Luc Savard, 2011. "The Labour Market in CGE Models," Cahiers de recherche 11-20, Departement d'Economique de l'École de gestion à l'Université de Sherbrooke.
    2. Ramos Mabugu & Margaret Chitiga, 2007. "Poverty and inequality effects of a high growth scenario in South Africa: A dynamic microsimulation CGE analysis," Working Papers 04/2007, Stellenbosch University, Department of Economics.
    3. Ramos Mabugu & Margaret Chitiga, 2007. "South Africa Trade Liberalization and Poverty in a Dynamic Microsimulation CGE Model," Working Papers 200718, University of Pretoria, Department of Economics.
    4. Mabugu, Ramos & Robichaud, Veronique & Maisonnave, Helene & Chitiga, Margaret, 2013. "Impact of fiscal policy in an intertemporal CGE model for South Africa," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 31(C), pages 775-782.
    5. Franck Viroleau, 2015. "The Evolution of Gender Wage Inequality in Senegal Following the Economic Partnership Agreements," EconomiX Working Papers 2015-10, University of Paris Nanterre, EconomiX.
    6. Ramos Mabugu & Margaret Chitiga, 2007. "Poverty and Inequality Impacts of Trade Policy Reforms in South Africa," Working Papers MPIA 2007-19, PEP-MPIA.
    7. Filipski, Mateusz & Edward Taylor, J. & Msangi, Siwa, 2011. "Effects of Free Trade on Women and Immigrants: CAFTA and the Rural Dominican Republic," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 39(10), pages 1862-1877.
    8. Gemma Wright & Michael Noble & Helen Barnes & David McLennan & Michell Mpike, 2016. "SAMOD, a South African tax-benefit microsimulation model Recent developments," WIDER Working Paper Series 115, World Institute for Development Economic Research (UNU-WIDER).

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