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Targeting fuel poverty in England: is the government getting warm?

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  • Tom Sefton

Abstract

Scheme (HEES), a key component of the UK government’s Fuel Poverty Strategy. The impact on the fuel poverty gap is simulated using data on a large-scale and representative sample of households in England. The scope for improving the scheme’s targeting is considered by examining the optimal allocation of grants between households. The extent to which these potential gains might be achieved in practice using pragmatic criteria for distributing grants, and the implications of taking into account the dynamics of fuel poverty and the self-selection of grant applicants, are also explored. The current scheme is unlikely to have a very significant impact on fuel poverty, and considerable gains could be achieved by redesigning HEES, although the paper also highlights the difficulties involved in efficient targeting, including some additional complications not encountered in the analysis of more traditional anti-poverty measures.

Suggested Citation

  • Tom Sefton, 2002. "Targeting fuel poverty in England: is the government getting warm?," Fiscal Studies, Institute for Fiscal Studies, vol. 23(3), pages 369-399, September.
  • Handle: RePEc:ifs:fistud:v:23:y:2002:i:3:p:369-399
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Schaffrin, André & Reibling, Nadine, 2015. "Household energy and climate mitigation policies: Investigating energy practices in the housing sector," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 77(C), pages 1-10.
    2. Walker, Ryan & Liddell, Christine & McKenzie, Paul & Morris, Chris, 2013. "Evaluating fuel poverty policy in Northern Ireland using a geographic approach," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 63(C), pages 765-774.
    3. Sovacool, Benjamin K., 2015. "Fuel poverty, affordability, and energy justice in England: Policy insights from the Warm Front Program," Energy, Elsevier, vol. 93(P1), pages 361-371.
    4. Miniaci, Raffaele & Scarpa, Carlo & Valbonesi, Paola, 2014. "Energy affordability and the benefits system in Italy," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 75(C), pages 289-300.
    5. Reames, Tony Gerard, 2016. "Targeting energy justice: Exploring spatial, racial/ethnic and socioeconomic disparities in urban residential heating energy efficiency," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 97(C), pages 549-558.
    6. Waddams Price, Catherine & Brazier, Karl & Wang, Wenjia, 2012. "Objective and subjective measures of fuel poverty," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 49(C), pages 33-39.
    7. Roberts, Deborah & Vera-Toscano, Esperanza & Phimister, Euan, 2015. "Fuel poverty in the UK: Is there a difference between rural and urban areas?," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 87(C), pages 216-223.
    8. Fernando Navajas Hancevic y & Pedro Hancevic, 2008. "Adaptación Tarifaria y Tarifa Social: Simulaciones para Gas Natural y Electricidad en el AMBA," Working Papers 96, FIEL.
    9. Burholt, Vanessa & Windle, Gill, 2006. "Keeping warm? Self-reported housing and home energy efficiency factors impacting on older people heating homes in North Wales," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 34(10), pages 1198-1208, July.
    10. Raffaele Miniaci & Carlo Scarpa & Paola Valbonesi, 2014. "Fuel poverty and the energy benefits system: The Italian case," IEFE Working Papers 66, IEFE, Center for Research on Energy and Environmental Economics and Policy, Universita' Bocconi, Milano, Italy.
    11. Rosenow, Jan & Platt, Reg & Flanagan, Brooke, 2013. "Fuel poverty and energy efficiency obligations – A critical assessment of the supplier obligation in the UK," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 62(C), pages 1194-1203.

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • D61 - Microeconomics - - Welfare Economics - - - Allocative Efficiency; Cost-Benefit Analysis
    • H42 - Public Economics - - Publicly Provided Goods - - - Publicly Provided Private Goods
    • Q48 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Energy - - - Government Policy

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