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A heterodox teaching of neoclassical microeconomic theory


  • Frederic S. Lee


In this article, I advocate a different way to teach neoclassical microeconomic theory to graduate students in heterodox programs that accomplishes the goals of providing them with a critical and 'technical' understanding of neoclassical theory as well as a critical awareness of how heterodox microeconomic theory is organised, structured, and different. In this way, it is possible to calm the fears of many heterodox economists that the complete dismissal of neoclassical microeconomic theory is not a nihilistic endeavour, but a connected prelude to delineating a heterodox microeconomic theory. It is done by teaching microeconomic theory as a critical historical discourse, or more precisely a historical story, that deals with its evolution and its theoretical and empirical shortcomings that place the theory in the incoherent state that it is in today.

Suggested Citation

  • Frederic S. Lee, 2010. "A heterodox teaching of neoclassical microeconomic theory," International Journal of Pluralism and Economics Education, Inderscience Enterprises Ltd, vol. 1(3), pages 203-235.
  • Handle: RePEc:ids:ijplur:v:1:y:2010:i:3:p:203-235

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    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.

    Cited by:

    1. Grahamm Errol G., 2013. "Perverse supply response in the Liberian mining sector," Policy Research Working Paper Series 6663, The World Bank.
    2. Jo, Tae-Hee, 2016. "A Heterodox Theory of the Business Enterprise," MPRA Paper 72426, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    3. Lee, Frederic, 2011. "History of the economics department at University of Missouri-Kansas City," MPRA Paper 30492, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    4. Wicks, Rick, 2011. "Assumption without representation: the unacknowledged abstraction from communities and social goods," MPRA Paper 51674, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    5. Lima, Gerson P., 2015. "Supply and Demand Is Not a Neoclassical Concern," MPRA Paper 63135, University Library of Munich, Germany.


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