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Perceptions of Priority Policy Areas and Interventions for Urban Sustainability in Polish Municipalities: Can Polish Cities Become Smart, Inclusive and Green?

Author

Listed:
  • Justyna Przywojska

    () (Department of Labour and Social Policy, University of Łódź; ul. Rewolucji 1905 r. nr 37, 90-214 Łódź, Poland)

  • Aldona Podgórniak-Krzykacz

    () (Department of Labour and Social Policy, University of Łódź; ul. Rewolucji 1905 r. nr 37, 90-214 Łódź, Poland)

  • Justyna Wiktorowicz

    () (Department of Economic and Social Statistics, University of Łódź; ul. Rewolucji 1905 r. nr 41, 90-214 Łódź, Poland)

Abstract

The transition to sustainable urban development requires both appropriate city management and local authorities that are aware of the implications posed by new urban sustainability challenges. The article aims to identify the priority policy/practice areas and interventions to solve sustainability challenges in Polish municipalities, as well as the factors that differentiate these priorities. Through an online questionnaire we surveyed 460 Polish municipalities, and conducted a multidimensional assessment concerning how mayors (and their executive teams) prioritise possible policy/practice areas and interventions related to sustainability. Our analysis implies that the mayors (and their executive teams) assign higher priority to policy/practice areas and interventions related to economic and social domains, and slightly lower priority to environmental ones. However, an important finding is that the priority policy/practice areas and interventions do not correspond well to some of the contemporary sustainability challenges in Polish cities. Effectively tackling urban environmental, economic and social problems would require the implementation of new approaches related to smart cities, the circular economy and/or cultural diversity. However, these less traditional policy/practice areas and interventions are quite low on the priority list of Polish mayors and their executive teams. Interestingly mayors and executive teams that prefer more participatory and solidarity-based management approaches are more likely to prioritise less traditional policy/practice areas and interventions to solve urban sustainability challenges in their municipalities.

Suggested Citation

  • Justyna Przywojska & Aldona Podgórniak-Krzykacz & Justyna Wiktorowicz, 2019. "Perceptions of Priority Policy Areas and Interventions for Urban Sustainability in Polish Municipalities: Can Polish Cities Become Smart, Inclusive and Green?," Sustainability, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 11(14), pages 1-24, July.
  • Handle: RePEc:gam:jsusta:v:11:y:2019:i:14:p:3962-:d:250364
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Paulo Caldas & Diogo Cunha Ferreira & Brian Dollery & Rui Cunha Marques, 2018. "Municipal Sustainability Influence by European Union Investment Programs on the Portuguese Local Government," Sustainability, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 10(4), pages 1-23, March.
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    sustainable cities; local government; local governance; urban policy priorities;

    JEL classification:

    • Q - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics
    • Q0 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - General
    • Q2 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Renewable Resources and Conservation
    • Q3 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Nonrenewable Resources and Conservation
    • Q5 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Environmental Economics
    • Q56 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Environmental Economics - - - Environment and Development; Environment and Trade; Sustainability; Environmental Accounts and Accounting; Environmental Equity; Population Growth
    • O13 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Agriculture; Natural Resources; Environment; Other Primary Products

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