IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/a/gam/jscscx/v5y2016i4p61-d80479.html
   My bibliography  Save this article

Banishment in Public Housing: Testing an Evolution of Broken Windows

Author

Listed:
  • Jose Torres

    () (Department of Sociology, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, LA 70803, USA)

  • Jacob Apkarian

    () (Department of Behavioral Sciences, City University of New York, York College, Jamaica, NY 11451, USA)

  • James Hawdon

    () (Department of Sociology, Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, VA 24060, USA)

Abstract

Banishment policies grant police the authority to formally ban individuals from entering public housing and arrest them for trespassing if they violate the ban. Despite its widespread use and the social consequences resulting from it, an empirical evaluation of the effectiveness of banishment has not been performed. Understanding banishment enforcement is an evolution of broken windows policing, this study explores how effective bans are at reducing crime in public housing. We analyze crime data, spanning the years 2001–2012, from six public housing communities and 13 surrounding communities in one southeastern U.S. city. Using Arellano-Bond dynamic panel models, we investigate whether or not issuing bans predicts reductions in property and violent crimes as well as increases in drug and trespass arrests in public housing. We find that this brand of broken windows policing does reduce crime, albeit relatively small reductions and only for property crime, while resulting in an increase in trespass arrests. Given our findings that these policies have only a modest impact on property crime, yet produce relatively larger increases in arrests for minor offenses in communities of color, and ultimately have no significant impact on violent crime, it will be important for police, communities, and policy makers to discuss whether the returns are worth the potential costs.

Suggested Citation

  • Jose Torres & Jacob Apkarian & James Hawdon, 2016. "Banishment in Public Housing: Testing an Evolution of Broken Windows," Social Sciences, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 5(4), pages 1-26, October.
  • Handle: RePEc:gam:jscscx:v:5:y:2016:i:4:p:61-:d:80479
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://www.mdpi.com/2076-0760/5/4/61/pdf
    Download Restriction: no

    File URL: http://www.mdpi.com/2076-0760/5/4/61/
    Download Restriction: no

    More about this item

    Keywords

    broken windows; banishment; public housing; crime; policing;

    JEL classification:

    • A - General Economics and Teaching
    • B - Schools of Economic Thought and Methodology
    • N - Economic History
    • P - Economic Systems
    • Y80 - Miscellaneous Categories - - Related Disciplines - - - Related Disciplines
    • Z00 - Other Special Topics - - General - - - General

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:gam:jscscx:v:5:y:2016:i:4:p:61-:d:80479. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (XML Conversion Team). General contact details of provider: http://www.mdpi.com/ .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    We have no references for this item. You can help adding them by using this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.